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What is "Abaca" - Definition & Explanation

A banana-like plant (Musa textilis) native to the Philippines which has broad leaves with long stalks. The fibres obtained from the stalks are used to make cordage, fabric, and paper. (Also called manila and manila hemp. ).
A vegetable leaf fiber derived from the Musa textilis plant. It is mainly grown in the Philippines but is also found, in smaller amounts, in Africa, Malaysia, Indonesia and Costa Rica. The fiber is obtained from the outer layer of the leaf. Processing occurs when it is separated mechanically into lengths varying from 3 to 9 feet. Abaca is very strong and has great luster. It is very resistant to damage from salt water.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Any single filament, generally a coarser manufactured fiber. Monofilaments are generally spun individually, rather than being extruded through the spinneret in groups of filaments. Cross-sections may...
Oil from the linen (flax) plant's seeds. Used as a finish, often "Boiled" (containing metallic driers) or "Raw" (natural). Also used as a component in most oil-based varnishes, including polyurethane...
The capacity of cellulosics to resist creasing. These fabrics can be impregnated with a monomer or precondensate which is polmerised to a thermo-set resin. This process confers increased recovery on...
A shrug is an article of clothing, a sleeved sweater that covers the chest, shoulders and/or arms. It is usually worn by women. Generally, a shrug covers less of the body than a vest would, but it is...
A woven fabric generally of cotton or a cotton blend with a short, dense pile resembling velvet. Velveteen differs from velvet in that it is usually made with cotton, it generally has a shorter pile...

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