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What is "Abaca" - Definition & Explanation

A banana-like plant (Musa textilis) native to the Philippines which has broad leaves with long stalks. The fibres obtained from the stalks are used to make cordage, fabric, and paper. (Also called manila and manila hemp. ).
A vegetable leaf fiber derived from the Musa textilis plant. It is mainly grown in the Philippines but is also found, in smaller amounts, in Africa, Malaysia, Indonesia and Costa Rica. The fiber is obtained from the outer layer of the leaf. Processing occurs when it is separated mechanically into lengths varying from 3 to 9 feet. Abaca is very strong and has great luster. It is very resistant to damage from salt water.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

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a) The second of the three basic motions in weaving, in which the weft is passed through the warp shed. b) The rectification of the face and the back of a carpet after manufacture, including...

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