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What is "Bast Fibre" - Definition & Explanation

Fibre obtained from the stems of certain types of plant.
Strong, soft, woody fibers, such as flax, jute, hemp, and ramie, which are obtained from the inner bark in the stems of certain plants.
The woody inner core of the stalk, typically about 20-30% of the stalk. Bast fibres come in two varieties: primary, which are long in length and low in lignin content, and secondary which are medium lengths, higher in lignin when the plants are grown in less dense stands.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Embroidery is the art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle. Embroidery may also incorporate other materials such as...
Basting is the process of temporarily sewing or pinning fabric together. This can be done by hand or by machine. Quilters use basting to temporarily position applique pieces. They also baste the top,...
A broom is a cleaning tool consisting of stiff fibres attached to, and roughly parallel to, a cylindrical handle, the broomstick. In the context of witchcraft, "broomstick" is likely to refer to the...
A method of applying short fibers rather than color to the entire surface of the fabric. The fabric may be printed with an adhesive and the fiber dusted, onto it, or the fibers may be contained in...
A double-knit fabric in which the rib wales or vertical rows of stitches intermesh alternatively on the face and the back of the fabric. Rib knit fabrics have good elasticity and shape retention,...

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