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What is "Bi Component Fibres" - Definition & Explanation

Fibres spun from two different polymers. The most common types are made from polymers which have different melting points and are used for thermal bonding. Another variant is produced from polymers which have differing solubilities. In this case one polymer may later be dissolved out to leave ultra-fine filaments. An example is the production of suede-like fabrics. This process is also used to create crimping, in order to provide bulk or stretch.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A type of running stitch composed of three stitches placed back and forth between two points. Often used for outlining because it eliminates the need for repeatedly digitizing a single-ply running...
Color applied to previously dyed color. A process of hand dyeing that works color into the base material. Usually unevenly spaced and vari-colored. Allows the previously dyed color (base color) to...
The property of fibers that measures strength. This is determined by the force required to rupture of break the fiber. Typically, this is measure is grams per denier, or g/d. Tensile strength measres...
Made from linen or cotton with a dobby or basket weave. It is strong. Rough in the surface finish but finer, shinier than cotton huckaback. Has variation in weaves but most have small squares on the...
To align strands of FILLING YARN and push them up close together as they are woven. The REED accomplishes this by advancing and receding from the cloth after each passage of the SHUTTLE, driving each...

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