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What is "Bi Component Fibres" - Definition & Explanation

Fibres spun from two different polymers. The most common types are made from polymers which have different melting points and are used for thermal bonding. Another variant is produced from polymers which have differing solubilities. In this case one polymer may later be dissolved out to leave ultra-fine filaments. An example is the production of suede-like fabrics. This process is also used to create crimping, in order to provide bulk or stretch.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The combing process is an additional step beyond carding. In this process the fibers are arranged in a highly parallel form, and additional short fibers are removed, producing high quality yarns with...
A woven fabric generally of cotton or a cotton blend with a short, dense pile resembling velvet. Velveteen differs from velvet in that it is usually made with cotton, it generally has a shorter pile...
Two separate fabrics faces knitted independently and then connected by a separate spacer yarn. These fabrics can be produced on both circular and flat knitting machines. Spacer fabrics have the...
A needlepoint lace on a fine net background. Characterized by a heavy thread (cordonnet) outlining the design. Although usually machine made, there are instances where the cordonnet is inserted/done...
A woven fabric with a series of faint stripes formed by the arrangement of light, medium, and dark warp yarns or by twisting together 2 yarns of different colors. Used for drapery, upholstery,...

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