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What is "Bi Component Fibres" - Definition & Explanation

Fibres spun from two different polymers. The most common types are made from polymers which have different melting points and are used for thermal bonding. Another variant is produced from polymers which have differing solubilities. In this case one polymer may later be dissolved out to leave ultra-fine filaments. An example is the production of suede-like fabrics. This process is also used to create crimping, in order to provide bulk or stretch.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A belt is a flexible band, made of either leather or a type of cloth, worn around the waist, normally serving the purpose of supporting the clothing material, particularly trousers. A belt has been...
Medium weight, durable fabric made of cotton or cotton blend yarns. A tightly woven, strong fabric that is often finished with a water repellant coating. In men's wear most commonly used for trench...
Fiber reactive dyes are dyes used to color cellulosic and protein fibers such as cotton, rayon and soy. The dyestuff bonds to the fibers through a chemical reaction and does not require the use of...
A Finishing Process That Produces A High Gloss On The Surface On The Fabric By Passing It Through Heavy Rollers (calendering) . Fabrics Made Of Thermoplastic Fibers Like Nylon Or Polyester Are Cired...
A rotation, usually lateral, between different panels of a garment resulting from the release of latent stresses during laundering of the woven or knitted fabric forming the garment. Twist may also...

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