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What is "Bi Component Fibres" - Definition & Explanation

Fibres spun from two different polymers. The most common types are made from polymers which have different melting points and are used for thermal bonding. Another variant is produced from polymers which have differing solubilities. In this case one polymer may later be dissolved out to leave ultra-fine filaments. An example is the production of suede-like fabrics. This process is also used to create crimping, in order to provide bulk or stretch.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The coloring of greige goods or fibers with either natural or synthetic dyes. This may be done in many different ways depending on the type of fabric (or fiber), the type of dye and the desired...
A measurement used to evaluate the effectiveness of an insulated product in relation to weather conditions and the environment. The insulation with the best rating is down. Down provides the best...
Plain weave fabric (cotton, silk, rayon, synthetics) having a slightly irregular surface due to uneven slubbed filling yarns. It is a raw silk made from Tussah silk or silk waste, depending on the...
Cotton, and sometimes silk, in a Leno, gauze, knotted, or mesh weave. First made in France in 1834, it has a dull surfaced net with various sized holes. Has white or colored dots individually spaced...
Jute is a long, soft, shiny plant fibre that can be spun into coarse, strong threads. Jute is one of the cheapest natural fibres, and is second only to cotton in amount produced and variety of uses....

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