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What is "Blotch" - Definition & Explanation

Uneven absorbtion of wood stain due to changing directions of the wood grain at the surface. Some woods such as pine, cherry and maple are prone to blotch. This is sometimes confused with "figure" where there is a variation in the wood tones when finished. The former is normally a defect and the latter is not. You can prevent blotch by pre-sealing the wood with a "spit-coat" (thinned) coat of shellac, "wood conditioner", use of dye instead of pigment, or by using a gel stain that has

Some other terms

Some more terms:

This lace often has a high profile, and is made using a needlepoint technique rather than embroidery. A heavier weight lace, the patterns vary from geometric to floral. Each pattern is attached to...
The combination of two or more types of staple fibers and/or colors in one yarn. Blends are sometimes so intimate that It is difficult to distinguish component fibers in yarn or fabric. A highly...
Foam finishing is an alternate process for applying wet finishes in which the finishing chemical is applied as foam, using air as a diluter instead of water. This process reduces energy and water...
Basic internal structure or skeleton of an upholstered piece. Kiln-dried hardwood is best for durability in wooden frames, but often engineered wood products are used. Metals are also used in marine...
Fixing is the term described for the various ways of getting dyes stuck onto or into fibres. Fixing is part of the dyeing process and differs from after-fixing which is generally used to describe a...

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