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What is "Blotch" - Definition & Explanation

Uneven absorbtion of wood stain due to changing directions of the wood grain at the surface. Some woods such as pine, cherry and maple are prone to blotch. This is sometimes confused with "figure" where there is a variation in the wood tones when finished. The former is normally a defect and the latter is not. You can prevent blotch by pre-sealing the wood with a "spit-coat" (thinned) coat of shellac, "wood conditioner", use of dye instead of pigment, or by using a gel stain that has

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Color changes in localized areas of a garment due to differential wear, such as the knees of blue jeans. Often evident in cross-dye shades of blends where durable press treatments are applied. Color...
A medium to heavy of plain or twill weave fabric in which colorful yarn slubs are woven into the fabric. Made from wool but can also be made from rayons and cottons. It is mostly made from a plain...
Piece of scrap material sewn to the cover were additional length is needed to fasten to the frame. This is used in areas that will not be seen in use of the completed piece. Used to provide...
Refers to the ability of a fabric to move moisture (sweat) away from the skin to the outer layer of fabric where it can evaporate more easily thus helping to keep the skin dry. Used in activewear and...
A finish which causes tiny fibrils or fibrous elements to be spilt from the fibers and protrude from the surface of the fabric. Results in a frosted, hazy, laundered appearance and a soft hand....

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