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What is "Break" - Definition & Explanation

Point on the front edge of the garment at which the roll of the lapel begins. Usually at the same point as the lower end of the bridle.
Break a temporary interference with the growth of the wool, causing a marked thinning of all or a proportion of the fibre population, and producing distinct weaknesses in one part of the staple. It is caused by a sudden change of pasture, want of feed or water, sickness, bad lambing, or faulty dipping.
Wool that is abnormally weaker in one spot along the fiber length.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A Short, Bodice-like Breast Garment Of Wide Popularity Among Women In India, From Early Times. Related To The Classic Cholaka Mentioned In Sanskrit Literature. The Garment Is Worn In Many Styles;...
(Two-piece) - When two identical pieces of fabric are placed back-to-back at the top of a pant, raw edges turned inside, and joined with two widely spaced rows of stitching. the pant body is inserted...
A system of measuring the weight of a continuous filament fiber. In the United States, this measurement is used to number all manufactured fibers (both filament and staple), and silk, but excludes...
Also known as “vegetable cashmere”, soybean fiber is a sustainable textile fiber made from the residue of soybeans from tofu production. It is part of an effort to move consumers away from...
The fleece comes from a Cashmere goat. These animals roam at high elevations (10,000-15,000 ft.), hence their very warm, soft fleece. Garments made with cashmere are normally more expensive because...

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