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What is "Burn-in" - Definition & Explanation

A wood repair using a solid fill, usually shellac, lacquer or related resins, heated and melted with a hot blade and flowed into a defect. The blade is called a burn-in knife and is heated electrically, by a butane flame, or over an alcohol lamp.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A process of passing cloths between one or more rollers (or calenders), usually under carefully controlled heat and pressure, to produce a variety of surface effects or textures in a fabric such as...
Unbleached muslin bed sheeting-sometimes called Kraft muslin-used as a base fabric on which a chenille effect is formed by application of candlewick (heavy-piled yarns) loops which are then cut to...
Sheared from free range roaming sheep that have not been subjected to toxic flea dipping, and have not been treated with chemicals, dyes, or bleaches. Eco wool comes in natural tones of white, grey...
The consistent interloping of yarns in the jersey stitch to produce a fabric with a smooth, flat face, and a more textured, but uniform back. Jersey fabrics may be produced on either circular of flat...
This is both the name of a fabric and a fiber. A manufactured fiber introduced in the early 1950s, it is second only to cotton in worldwide use. Its ability to stretch and resist wrinkling makes it a...

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