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What is "Burn-in" - Definition & Explanation

A wood repair using a solid fill, usually shellac, lacquer or related resins, heated and melted with a hot blade and flowed into a defect. The blade is called a burn-in knife and is heated electrically, by a butane flame, or over an alcohol lamp.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A tightly woven fabric made by using only long staple, combed wool or wool-blend yarns. The fabric has a hard, smooth surface. Gabardine is an example of a worsted fabric. A common end use is men's...
Warp stripes that occur at regular intervals across part or all of the fabric width as the result of tension variation in the sections during section warping or because of differential dyeability of...
The generic name for fibres composed of synthetic linear macromolecules that have in the chain recurring amide groups, at least 85% of which are joined directly to two aromatic rings and in which...
The chemise, called a "smock" or "shift" in the 16th century, was a simple garment worn next to the skin to protect clothing from sweat and body oils. Chemise is the French term. Italians called it a...
Made from cotton, linen, rayon in a plain or twill weave. Quality and price vary a great deal. The warp counts are finer than the filling counts which are spun rather loose. Strong substantial and...

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