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What is "Buttonhole" - Definition & Explanation

(straight) - Formed by two pairs of straight, parallel rows of zigzag stitching, followed by a single, straight knife cut. Each end of the row of stitching is secured by a bartack.
(eyelet) - Formed by a contoured patch of zig-zag stitching, followed by a cut---a portion of which is circular. Eyelet buttonholes are usually used on heavy fabrics and/or with large buttons. A gimp or cord is usually contained within the stitches to provide a reinforcement along the edge of the hole.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A tangled ball of fibers that appears on the surface of a fabric, as a result of wear or continued friction or rubbing on the surface of the fabric. Occurs as a result of fibers loosening from the...
Refers to a coating that repels water but allows water vapor (thus perspiration) to pass through, allowing garments to be comfortable and waterproof. Used in garments for active wear and winter...
Two small, back to back outward facing pleats that have a box- like appearance. On shirts, box pleats are positioned in the center back at the bottom of the yoke to allow ease of movement in the...
Fustian is a term for a variety of heavy twilled woven cotton fabrics, chiefly prepared for menswear. Usually dyed in a dark shade. Declined in popularity from 1813, being replaced by harder wearing...
A mechanical treatment that uses beetlers or fallers to give fabric surfaces a flattened appearance. The spaces between warp and filling are covered up and tend to produce a high gloss to the...

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