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What is "Bycast" - Definition & Explanation

This process is usually used on splits, or heavily buffed leather The finishing fim is created on a continuous release paper. An adhesive is applied to the film, and then it is pressed onto the leather. The finished leather is then removed from the paper, leaving a perfectly uniform surface. When stretched one will see a lighter color, that reverts back to the original when the pressure is released. Although stronger than a regular split hide, this is not top-grain. It is inexpensive,

Some other terms

Some more terms:

French for "false" can be anything made to simulate something that it's not. Examples: Faux graining (painting grain lines on figureless wood), faux suede (non-leather fabric made to simulate suede...
Fibres spun from two different polymers. The most common types are made from polymers which have different melting points and are used for thermal bonding. Another variant is produced from polymers...
A term used to describe fabrics which have been joined together through the use of a high-strength reinforcing scrim or base fabrics between two plies of flexible thermoplastic film.. It can a bonded...
An acetic acid ester of cellulose. It is obtained by the action, under rigidly controlled conditions, of acetic acid and acetic anhydride on purified cellulose usually obtained from cotton linters....
A manufactured fiber composed of regenerated cellulose, as well as manufactured fibers composed of regenerated celluluse in which substituents have replaced not more than 15% of the hydrogens of the...

Companies for Bycast:


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