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What is "Cambrian Tweed" - Definition & Explanation

Rough woollen fabric made in the uplands of Mid-Wales from the local hardy sheep. Plain weave, hopsack, or herringbone weaves are the most usual and the yarns are either dyed with synthetic dyes for better fastness or, more attractively, left in their natural colours of white, grey and black (al-though the sheep in the field look brown), and mixed together. Used for hardwearing clothes such as men's suits, sports jackets, Norfolk skirts and jackets. The coarser yarn is made into rugs.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

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