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What is "Cationic" - Definition & Explanation

A type of dye used on acrylic or on modified polyester or modified nylon yarn. Often used to achieve cross dyed effects: Cationic dyeable yarn is woven in a pattern with regular yarn in the same fabric. The pattern becomes visible by dyeing the fabric in 2 baths, one for each of the types of yarn.
A type of fiber variant that takes deep and brilliant colors. When mixed or blended with conventional fibers various multi-color and cross-dye effects are possible in a fabric from one dye bath or treatment.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A tough medium to heavyweight coarsely woven plain weave fabric, usually made of a cotton or cotton/poly blend. Lower grades of the unfinished fabric are used for such industrial purposes as bags,...
A French Term Meaning Shaded. It Is Used In Relation To Textiles (a) As An Adjective To Describe Fabrics With A Dyed, Printed, Or Woven Design In Which The Colour Is Graduated From Light To Dark And...
Of or relating to habitat or household, mostly used as a prefix related to ecology. Eco comes from the ancient Greek word "oikos" (house). e. g. eco-label, eco-friendly, eco-shopping. Within the...
A manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is a long chain of synthetic polyamide in which at least 85% of the amide linkages are attached directly to two aromatic rings. Aramid...
The generic name given to a new family of cellulosic fibres and yarns that have been produced by solvent spinning. The process is widely regarded as being environmentally-friendly, and the product...

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