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What is "Chapel Train" - Definition & Explanation

The most popular of all train lengths, it flows from three to four feet behind the gown.
The train on a wedding dress that extends 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 feet from the waist.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

This lace often has a high profile, and is made using a needlepoint technique rather than embroidery. A heavier weight lace, the patterns vary from geometric to floral. Each pattern is attached to...
A general term for cotton fabrics used as backings for various abrasive and polishing agents. Usually sheetings and drills are employed extensively and twills in smaller quantities. The fabric is...
A fibre formed by the conjunction at a spinning jet, of two fibre-forming polymers of different properties. NOTE: a) The two components may be caused to merge approximately side by side...
Needlepoint is a form of canvas work created on a mesh canvas. The stitching threads used may be wool, silk, or rarely cotton. Stitches may be plain, covering just one mesh intersection with a single...
Trouser-like Garment, Worn On The Lower Part Of The Body Alike By Men And Women. Literally, 'leg-clothing'. The Pyjama Was Worn In Many Cuts And Shapes, Much Variation Being Seen In Respect Of Girth,...

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