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What is "Chatoyance" - Definition & Explanation

From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and positions. Certain finishes such as shellac or oil tend to bring out the chatoyance of the wood.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Lucet is a method of cordmaking or braiding which is believed to date back to the Viking era. Lucet cord is square, strong, and slightly springy. It closely resembles knitted I-cord or the cord...
A system of manufacturing in which shaped pieces are cut from a layer of fabric and stitched together to form garments. In the case of tubular knitted fabric, the cloth is either cut down one side...
Colloquial term for upholsterer. Before pneumatic staplers, upholstery was commonly attached to frames with tacks. An upholsterer would put tacks in his/her mouth (which is why many were advertized...
A sheer, woven, mercerized fabric of combed cotton or polyester/cotton resembling nainsook, only finer, with a lengthwise streak. A rayon fabric decorated with dobby woven stripes and jacquard...
A twill originally consisting of worsted filling and silk warp. Today, it can be found in a variety of blends. It has excellent drapability. Its weight and quality vary with fibers, however, when...

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