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What is "Chatoyance" - Definition & Explanation

From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and positions. Certain finishes such as shellac or oil tend to bring out the chatoyance of the wood.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Cloth or fabric is a flexible artificial material made up of a network of natural or artificial fibres (thread or yarn) formed by weaving or knitting (textiles), or pressed into felt. Cloth is most...
A soft shaggy wool tweed fabric. Originally referred to only wool from the Shetland Islands in Scotland but now refers to any wool fabric with similar characteristics. May be woven or knit. Used for...
Results when all or some of the needles on circular knitting fail to function and fabric either falls off the machine or design is completely disrupted or destroyed. Many knitting needles are broken...
Chemically, a substance that dissolves other substances, thus forming a solution. Water dissolves more substances than any other, and is known as the "universal solvent". In upholstery, solvent...
A manufactured fiber that uses cellulose refined from cotton and/or wood pulp. Characteristics: fast drying, wrinkle- and shrinkage-resistant, crisp or soft depending on end use, luxurious in...

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