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What is "Chatoyance" - Definition & Explanation

From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and positions. Certain finishes such as shellac or oil tend to bring out the chatoyance of the wood.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

(also known as polyolefin and polypropylene) - A manufactured fiber characterized by its light weight, high strength, and abrasion resistance. Olefin is also good at transporting moisture, creating a...
Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which...
The production of spun yarns by a process in which the sliver (q.v.) or roving (q.v.) is opened or separated into its individual fibres or tufts and is subsequently reassembled in the spinning...
Processes performed after embroidery is complete. Includes trimming loose threads, cutting or tearing away excess backing, removing facing, cleaning any stains, pressing if needed, and packing for...
That side of a fabric, which is intended to be shown by reason of weave or finish, presents a better appearance. In many fabrics, especially industrial ones there are no distinction between face and...

Companies for Chatoyance:


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