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What is "Chatoyance" - Definition & Explanation

From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and positions. Certain finishes such as shellac or oil tend to bring out the chatoyance of the wood.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Formation of a non-woven fabric by suspending fibers in water to disperse them evenly. The suspension is poured onto a moving screen allowing the water to pass through and leaving a fiber web, which...
A necktie , also simply called a tie, is a piece of material worn around the neck. The modern necktie's original name was the four-in-hand tie. It is usually a dress requirement for businessmen and...
Fiber sources are found in nature. That is, "any fiber that exists as such in the natural state." (TFPIA) Natural fibers used to create upholstery fabric include cotton, linen, hemp, silk and wool....
A chemical process in which short fuzzy fibres are sealed into a yarn or are removed from the cloth to make the fabric more porous. The strength of the fabric is not impaired. A porous fabric permits...
A strong, rugged cloth made with a pronounced raised cord on a 63-degree twill weave. The weaves used for calvary twill and elastique are the same. Cavalry twill has a somewhat coarser rib effect...

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