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What is "Chatoyance" - Definition & Explanation

From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and positions. Certain finishes such as shellac or oil tend to bring out the chatoyance of the wood.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A sock is a baglike covering for the foot and/or lower leg, which is designed to ease chafing between the foot to keep the feet warm and absorb sweat from the feet. Sock lengths vary, from covering...
The place in the mill where goods are taken after weaving for inspection and repair. Examiners mark all defects, large or small with chalk; blemishes are also noted. If need be, brushing, shearing,...
Fibres spun from two different polymers. The most common types are made from polymers which have different melting points and are used for thermal bonding. Another variant is produced from polymers...
Scottish tartan fabric woven with a blue and black ground and green and white over-check. Medium weight, usually not heavy enough for outerwear. Originally all-wool, but now may contain a proportion...
Desirable changes in wood that provide interesting patterns at the surface. Examples are: flame, crotch (curl, Brit.), burl (burr, Brit.) , curly (tiger stripe, fiddle, fiddleback) and birdseye....

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