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What is "Corduroy" - Definition & Explanation

It is a weft pile or velveteen in which the pile forms ribs or cords along the warp direction.
A cut-pile fabric, usually cotton, in which the ribbed pile is produced with a supplementary weft yarn.
From the French word "cloth of kings," a strong and durable upholstery weight cut pile fabric usually made of cotton or rayon with narrow to wide ridges in the pile running vertically.
A cut weft pile fabric in which the cut fibres form a surface of cords or ribs in the warp direction.
Corduroy is a durable cloth.
A strong, durable, woven fabric characterized by vertical cut pile stripes or cords with a velvet- like nap. Corduroy is classified by the number of wales or cords to the inch. It is traditionally of cotton but may be cotton blends or other fibers as well. It is common in men's women's and children's apparel especially trousers.
Typically made of cotton but can be made of rayon and other textiles. It has a filling pile with a plain or twill back and is made with an extra filling yarn. Corduroy is in the velvet family of fabrics and it has narrow medium and wide wales, also thick and thin or checkerboard patterns. Wales have different widths and depths. Corduroy has to be cut all one way with pile running up. Most of it is washable, wears very well, and has a soft luster.
A strong, durable fabric with cotton ground and vertical cut-pile stripes (wales) formed by an extra system of filling yarns. The foundation of the fabric can be either a plain or twill weave. Of all cotton fabrics, corduroy is the warmest because its wales form an insulated cushion of air.
A pile fabric with the pile usually cut into ridges. The fabric was developed in France and for years was a specialty of royally, thus its name which means cord of the king.
A cut pile having cords and ribs in the wrap direction.
A cut weft pile fabric producing the effect of ribs in the direction of the warp. Traditionally used for producing hard wearing garments.
A fabric with ridges of pile (cords) running lengthwise. Cords are measured by “wales”. The higher the wale number, the thinner the cord.
Cut pile fabric woven with either wide or narrow wales formed by using extra filling. Back may be either plain or twill weave, the latter being better quality.
A fabric, usually made of cotton, utilizing a cut-pile weave construction. Extra sets of filling yarns are woven into the fabric to form ridges of yarn on the surface. The ridges are built so that clear lines can be seen when the pile is cut.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A method of printing resulting in short fibers, rather than color, being applied in a design to the surface of the fabric. The fabric may be printed with an adhesive and the fiber dusted onto it, or...
A hard-finished, low lustered, medium-weight fabric in a twill-weave construction. It is most commonly found in men's worsted suitings; however, it can also be found in a plain-weave construction of...
A fabric woven with chenille yarns which have a pile effect similar to velvet, and when woven through various warps can create a pile-like velvet, or. if woven on a jacquard loom, can look similar to...
A method of layout to determine a right angle (square corner) in frames, fabric, construction, etc. It derives from the fact that a triangle with sides of 3-4-5 will have a right angle. The legs will...
Has a longer or higher pile than velvet, but shorter than plush. It is pressed flat and has a high lustre made possible by a tremendous roller-press treatment given the material in finishing. Now...

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