What is "Crease Mark" - Definition & Explanation

Differs from crease streak in that streak will probably appear for an entire roll. Crease mark appears where creases are caused by fabric folds in the finishing process. On napped fabric, final pressing may not be able to restore fabric or original condition. Often discoloration is a problem.
A mark left in a fabric after a crease has been removed, and that may be caused by mechanical damage to fibres at the fold, by variation in treatment owing to the constriction along the fold, or by disturbance of the fabric structure.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Cutting fabric diagonally across the grain, causing the material to drape fluidly and elegantly across the body. Expensive due to it's inefficient use of fabric. Often used for silk or satin dresses...
A fabric from alpaca fibers or blends, (originally a cotton cloth with alpaca filling) that is used for dresses, coats, suits, and sweaters. It is also used as a pile lining for jackets and coats....
These are shedding, picking, and beating-up. Minor motions on looms are the take-up, let-off, and pattern. The first three motions are linked together as follows: a. Shedding Motion: The...
A double-knit fabric in which the rib wales or vertical rows of stitches intermesh alternatively on the face and the back of the fabric. Rib knit fabrics have good elasticity and shape retention,...
A fabric made using a rib variation of the plain weave. The construction is characterized by having a slight ridge effect in one direction, usually the filling. Poplin used to be associated with...

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