TextileGlossary.com

What is "Crease Resistance" - Definition & Explanation

A term used to indicate the capability of a textile material to resist creases or recover from creases (or both) incidental to use.
The capacity of cellulosics to resist creasing. These fabrics can be impregnated with a monomer or precondensate which is polmerised to a thermo-set resin. This process confers increased recovery on the fabric thereby minimising creasing.
A fabric finish often used with linen and cotton to help the fabric resist wrinkles and creases.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Coarse, canvas-like fabric usually made of jute, but can be made of hemp, or cotton. Sometimes called gunny. Used primarily for bale coverings and sacks and bags. Also used in furniture, drapery,...
A sarong is large sheet of fabric, often wrapped around the waist and worn as a skirt by men and women in southeast Asia and Pacific islands, particularly in Indonesia and Malaysia. The fabric is...
A yarn composed of two or more single yarns twisted together. Many two-ply yarns are used in carpet. In cut-pile carpet, eg, saxony, plied yarns must be heat-set to prevent untwisting under traffic....
A hand-sewn stitch alternating from one side of a seam to the other. When properly done, none of the thread shows. Often used to attach outside back panels, to sew the 4th side of a pillow, to hand...
Bombazine usually has silk or rayon warp and worsted filling. Imitations are made in cotton. Plain or twill. Very fine English fabric. Name comes from Latin "bombycinum" which means a silk in...

Companies for Crease Resistance:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Crease Resistance, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2019 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap