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What is "Crettone" - Definition & Explanation

Made from cotton, linen, rayon in a plain or twill weave. Quality and price vary a great deal. The warp counts are finer than the filling counts which are spun rather loose. Strong substantial and gives good wear. Printed cretonne often has very bright colors and patterns. The fabric has no luster (when glazed, it is called chintz). Some are warp printed and if they are, they are usually completely reversible. Designs run from the conservative to very wild and often completely cover the surface.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

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A design effect created on a woven fabric by the use of extra yarns which are woven into the fabric at a certain spot then allowed to float over the fabric to the next spot. The float threads are...
A Knit Or Woven Fabric With A Soft , Short Thick Nap Made By Brushing And Shearing. Knit Velours Are Used In Women's Tops And Sportswear. Wovens Are Usually Heavier In Weight And Used For Coats,...
A strong, durable fabric with cotton ground and vertical cut-pile stripes (wales) formed by an extra system of filling yarns. The foundation of the fabric can be either a plain or twill weave. Of all...
Distance or portion of a curtain rod that extends beyond the bracket and meets back at the wall. A return conceals the working parts of the hardware and prevents daylight from coming in between the...

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