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What is "Crinoline" - Definition & Explanation

A lightweight, plain weave, stiffened fabric with a low yarn count (few yarns to the inch in each direction). Used as a foundation to support the edge of a hem or puffed sleeve.
A lightweight, plain weave, stiffened fabric with a low yarn count (few yarns to the inch in each direction).
Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830.
A stiff, open weave fabric, usually heavily sized. Used mainly as lining or interlining.
A very loosely woven fiber with high rigidity. It is smooth, stiff, and has excellent strength. It's comes in a variety of shades from white to black.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A stitch laid down before other design elements to help stabilize stretchy fabrics and tack down wales or naps on fabrics such as corduroy, so the design's details don't get lost. May also be used to...
An extremely soft and environmentally sound material made from a combination of Angora rabbit hair and organic cotton. Unlike traditional Angora, cottagora can be machine washed and dried. It is also...
(polyolefin/polypropylene) - A manufactured fiber characterized by its light weight, high strength, and abrasion resistance. Olefin is also good at transporting moisture, creating a wicking action....
A rotation, usually lateral, between different panels of a garment resulting from the release of latent stresses during laundering of the woven or knitted fabric forming the garment. Twist may also...
The tendency of a yarn to become fuller-looking when wetted and dried under certain conditions. In practice, the overall yarn diameter increases slightly-resulting in a "halo effect" or softer...

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