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What is "Friction Calendering" - Definition & Explanation

The process of passing fabric through a calender in which a highly polished, usually heated steel bowl rotates at a higher surface speed than the softer (e.g. cotton-filled or paper-filled) bowl against which it works, thus producing a glaze on the face of the fabric that is in contact with the steel bowl.

NOTE:

The friction ratio is the ratio between the peripheral speed of the faster steel bowl and that of the slower bowl and is normally in the range 1:1 to 3:1.

A bright, shiny finish used on lining twills, sateen silesia, messaline and bind finish cloths. It is achieved when one calendar roller moves at a slightly increased speed over the other roller in the set. Rollers may or may not be heated.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

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