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What is "Frieze" - Definition & Explanation

(frizay) A looped pile fabric
A pile fabric with uncut loops with the patterns created by cutting some of the loops or using different color yarns.
Frieze is a coarse woollen cloth with a nap on one side, that was raised by scrubbing it to raise curls of fibre (French: frisť). In the 19th century rough cheap frieze was made of wool mixed with shoddy (see Shoddy).
A pile fabric with the loops left uncut. Usually the loops are sheared to various heights to form a pattern. Used widely for upholstery and slipcovers.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

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