TextileGlossary.com

What is "Glass Fiber" - Definition & Explanation

Fiberglass is material made from extremely fine fibers of glass. It is widely used in the manufacture of insulation and textiles.
An inorganic fiber which is very strong, but has poor flexibility and poor abrasion resistance. Glass will not burn and will not conduct electricity. It is impervious to insects, mildew, and sunlight. Today, the primary use of glass fiber is in such industrial applications as insulation or reinforcement of composite structures.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A design dominated by circular spots, which may be of any size, printed or woven into the fabric. Small dots are often called pin dots; medium to large dots may be referred to as aspirin dots, coin...
A manufactured assembly of fibres or yarns (or both) that has substantial surface area in relation to its thickness, and sufficient mechanical strength to give the assembly inherent...
(Heat Sealing) - A process of heat finishing that will stabilize many manufactured fiber fabrics in order that there will not be any subsequent change in shape or size. Heat setting is used to...
A popular staple lightweight sport coating tweed with a rough napped surface. Named for the Cheviot sheep from the Cheviot Hills of Scotland. Fabric is rugged, rather than harsh in hand, with...
The process of physically compressing (or shrinking) woven fabrics so that they don't shrink unacceptably when a customer washes them. Most fabric processes work under tension that stretch fabrics as...

Companies for Glass Fiber:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Glass Fiber, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2018 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap