TextileGlossary.com

What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A woven construction in which patterns are built in at spaced intervals through the use of extra warp and/or extra fill yarns are placed in selected areas. These yarns are woven into the fabric by...
A Knit Or Woven Fabric With A Soft , Short Thick Nap Made By Brushing And Shearing. Knit Velours Are Used In Women's Tops And Sportswear. Wovens Are Usually Heavier In Weight And Used For Coats,...
Silk, the fabric that makes its own statement. Say "silk" to someone and what do they visualize? No other fabric generates quite the same reaction. For centuries silk has had a reputation as a...
Hue refers to the wavelength of the color and is completely separate from the intensity or saturation of the color. For example a red hue can look brown at a very low saturation level and pink at a...
A yarn with two different staple or filament components: A plied yarn constructed of two different singles yarns. A core-spun or other wrapped yarn. A filament yarn combining two types of...

Companies for Mercerising:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Mercerising, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2018 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap