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What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A non-metallic mineral fiber which is not flammable. The fiber is woven into fabrics and used for theater curtains, ironing board covers, potholders, and other cloths where flameproof and heatproof...
Yarns created from various petrochemical technologies. Includes nylon, polyester, Dacron, orlon, lycra and the like. Used in the manufacture of menís undergarments in the second half of the 20th...
Brought to Damscus by Marco Polo in 13th Century. A jacquard woven fabric with floral or geometric patterns created with different weave effects. Can be woven self-tone: one color warp: different...
Refers to the ability of a fabric to move moisture (sweat) away from the skin to the outer layer of fabric where it can evaporate more easily thus helping to keep the skin dry. Used in activewear and...
A good quality wool. If it is made in cotton, it is usually called suede cloth. Duvetyn has a close satin weave that is brushed, singed, and sheared to conceal the weave. It has a smooth plush...

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