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What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A design effect created on a woven fabric by the use of extra yarns which are woven into the fabric at a certain spot then allowed to float over the fabric to the next spot. The float threads are...
Processes performed after embroidery is complete. Includes trimming loose threads, cutting or tearing away excess backing, removing facing, cleaning any stains, pressing if needed, and packing for...
A textile fabric made from an elastomer either alone or in combination with other textile materials. At room temperature an elastic fabric will stretch under tension and will return quickly and...
Originally, textiles such as cotton were coated in oil to create resistance to moisture. Now, resins from plastics are used instead of oil. Olefin is a very versatile fiber with excellent...
A fabric with a crinkied or puckered affect, generally in the direction to the warp, which is created either by tension weaving or through the application of a caustic soda solution which shrinks...

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