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What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

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