TextileGlossary.com

What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A fabric knitted on a circular knitting machine using interlocking loops and a double stitch on a double needle frame to form a fabric with double thickness. It is the same on both sides. Today, most...
1. A lightweight silk, cotton or man-made fiber dress fabric that is soft and drapes well. It is smooth, ahs a semi-lustrous satin face and dull back. Hard twist yarn is used for the warp with a...
The UPF rating indicates how effective a fabric is at blocking out solar ultraviolet radiation from reaching the skin. UPF ratings range from 15 to 50 with higher ratings indicating more effective...
Fibres spun from two different polymers. The most common types are made from polymers which have different melting points and are used for thermal bonding. Another variant is produced from polymers...
The technique of printing fabrics by transferring a printed design from paper to fabric via heat and pressure. It's derived from the art of daealcomania which is the process of tansferring pictures...

Companies for Mercerising:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Mercerising, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2017 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap