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What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A linen that is very rugged and substantial in feel. Comes in white or natural shades or could be dyed, printed, striped, or checked. The yarn is strong, irregular in diameter but smooth. Has a...
A chemical reagent capable of bleaching, e.g. oxidising agents such as sodium or calcium hypochlorite, sodium chlorite, permanganates, hydrogen peroxide, and reducing agents such as sulphur dioxide...
A long continuous, unbroken strand of fiber extruded from a spinneret in the form of a monofilament. Most manufactured fibers such as nylon, polyester, rayon, and acetate are made in continuous...
The process of applying dyes to fibres, yarns, fabrics or garments. The type of dye, method used and liquor ratio (i.e. The amount of water used relative to the amount of fabric) has a huge influence...
To achieve a matte, cotton-like texture, a jet of air is blown on a fiber to give it a rough, non-reflective surface. Textured fibers offer greater bulk and airiness to a fabric without increasing...

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