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What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

One of the softest fabrics made. Named from the American-Indian term “shale” meaning soft. Usually plain weave fabrics printed with delicate floral patterns, in Persian or cravat effects. ...
It is a fabric woven as 5 end satin weave using worsted warp and woolen weft. The fabric is given after treatments such as milling and raising, so as to impart a soft feel and handle. It finds use as...
A tightly woven fabric made by using only long staple, combed wool or wool-blend yarns. The fabric has a hard, smooth surface. Gabardine is an example of a worsted fabric. A common end use is men's...
A plain-woven cotton fabric; characterized by fine rib lines in the warp direction created by alternate coarse and fine ends, or by having two (or more) ends weaving as one alternately with a single...
Results from uneven wetting out on sanforize; usually caused by defective spray heads. Fabric will appear wavy or puckering when spread on cutting table. Difficult to detect while inspecting on...

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