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What is "Mercerising" - Definition & Explanation

Mercerisation alters the chemical structure of the cotton fibre. The structure of the fibre changes from alpha-cellulose to beta-cellulose. Mercerising results in the swelling of the cell wall which causes increases in the surface area and reflectance, and gives the fiber a softer feel and more lustrous appearance, increases strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, but also increases affinity to lint. Cotton with long staple fibre lengths responds best to mercerisation.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A tissue paper made without chemicals that would destroy the fabric fibers. Air erasable pen - A type of temporary marking pen which usually disappears within forty-eight hours. Album quilts -...
A finishing process to produce a pattern on a fabric by passing it through a calender in which a heated metal bowl engraved with the pattern works against a relatively soft bowl built up of...
The process of dyeing finished garments. Benefits are that colour decisions can be left until the last minute (reducing manufacture of unwanted merchandise) and you only dye the fabric in the garment...
A machine in which heavy bowls rotate in contact under mechanical pressure. NOTE: The bowls may be unheated or one may be a thick-walled steel shell heated internally. All bowls may rotate at the...
A finish, usually applied to fabrics made from cotton or other cellulosic fibres or their blends, which improves the crease recovery and smooth-drying properties of a fabric. In the process used most...

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