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What is "Mercerization" - Definition & Explanation

A treatment for cotton fabric or threads that involves a brief soaking in lye, under tension. This process increases luster, strength, absorbency, and dying capability, but reduces chemical resistance to acids and oxidizers.
A finishing process of treating a cotton yarn or fabric, in which the fabric or yarn is immersed in a caustic soda solution (sodium hydroxide) and later neutralized in acid. The process causes a permanent swelling of the fiber, resulting in an increased luster on the surface of the fabric, an increased affinity for dyes, and increased strength.
A process of treating a cotton yarn or fabric, in which the fabric or yarn is immersed in a caustic soda solution and later neutralized in acid. The process causes a permanent swelling of the fiber, resulting in an increased luster on the surface of the fabric, an increased affinity for dyes, and increased strength.
A treatment of cotton yarn or fabric to increase its luster. Its affinity for dyes is also enhanced. In the process, the material is immersed under tension in a sodium hydroxide (caustic soda) solution. This later is neutralized in acid. The process causes a permanent swelling of the fiber, thus increasing its luster.
a) The treatment of cellulosic textiles, in yarn or fabric form, with a concentrated solution of a caustic alkali whereby the fibres are swollen, their strength and dye affinity is increased and their handle (q.v.) is modified.

NOTE:

Stretching the swollen materials while wet with caustic alkali and then washing the alkali has the additional effect of enhancing the lustre (q.v.)

b) The process of steeping cellulose in a concentrated caustic soda solution.

This is a process in which the yarn is immersed in caustic soda solution and later neutralized in acid, which causes a permanents welling of the fiber resulting in an increased luster, affinity for dyes and strength.
Mercerization is a treatment for cotton fabric and thread mostly employed to give cotton a lustrous appearance. The series of processes was devised by John Mercer in the middle of 19th century.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The stitch variation of the rib stitch, which resembles two separate 1 x 1 ribbed fabrics that are interknitted. Plain (double knit) interlock stitch fabrics are thicker, heavier, and more stable...
Two series of pairs of chips that show increasing contrast within pairs, and are used visually for comparing the differences in colour of textile specimens or the degrees of staining of transfer...
The bias direction of a piece of woven fabric, usually referred to simply as 'the bias', is at 45 degrees to its warp and weft threads. Every piece of woven fabric has two biases, perpendicular to...
A strong, rugged cloth made with a pronounced raised cord on a 63-degree twill weave. The weaves used for calvary twill and elastique are the same. Cavalry twill has a somewhat coarser rib effect...
There are two basic methods for applying bonding or welded seams. The first method uses an adhesive film, and the application of heat to glue or laminate two substrates together. The second method...

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