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What is "Mercerizing" - Definition & Explanation

Treatment for cotton yarns and cotton goods to increase luster and improve strength and dye affinity.
One of the possible steps in "finishing" raw fabrics The cloth is treated with a caustic soda solution, which makes the fabric stronger and the colors brighter.
A finishing process used on cotton yarn and cloth that impregnates material with sodium hydroxide (caustic soda) solution. The treatment increases the fabrics' strength, affinity for dyes and luster.
A process that makes fabric shinier.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A broken twill weave composed of vertical sections which are alternately right hand and left hand in direction, resembling the vertebral structure of the herring (zigzag). The twill changes direction...
The way the fabric feels when it is touched. Terms like softness, crispness, dryness, silkiness are all terms that describe the hand of the fabric. A good hand refers to shape retention without...
A plain, woven, lightweight, extremely sheer, airy, and soft silk fabric, containing highly twisted filament yarns. The fabric, used mainly in evening dresses and scarves, can also be made from rayon...
A T-shirt (or tee shirt) is a shirt, usually with short sleeves and a round neck, put on over the head, usually without pockets (though terms such as long-sleeved T-shirt and sleeveless T-shirt are...
Mercerized cotton is cotton thread (or cotton-covered thread with a polyester core) that has been treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The thread is given a caustic soda bath that is then...

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