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What is "Noil" - Definition & Explanation

Shorter fibres separated from longer fibres in combing.
Noil is sportier in appearance and created by short fibers, often from the innermost part of the cocoon. Has the look of hopsack but much softer.
The shorter fibres separated from the longer fibres by combing during the preparatory process before spinning. Noils are a mixture of short and broken fibres, neps and vegetable matter. Noils may be used as one of the components in the woollen and felt trades.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Distance or portion of a curtain rod that extends beyond the bracket and meets back at the wall. A return conceals the working parts of the hardware and prevents daylight from coming in between the...
Also called Monk's cloth. A heavy, rough surfaced, hardwearing, loosely woven, basket weave fabric in solid colours. Sometimes stripes or plaids are woven into the fabric. Made of cotton or linen. It...
An individual or organization which buys grey fabrics and sells them as a finished product to cutters, wholesalers, retailers, and others. The converter arranges for the finishing of the fabric,...
The bias direction of a piece of woven fabric, usually referred to simply as 'the bias', is at 45 degrees to its warp and weft threads. Every piece of woven fabric has two biases, perpendicular to...
Sulfur dyes are the biggest volume dyes manufactured for cotton. They are cheap, generally have good wash-fastness and are easy to apply. The dyes are absorbed by cotton from a bath containing...

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