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What is "Osnaburg" - Definition & Explanation

A coarse, strong, plain weave, medium to heavy weight fabric, usually of cotton. Used for industrial purposes, drapery and upholstery.
A tough medium to heavyweight coarsely woven plain weave fabric, usually made of a cotton or cotton/poly blend. Lower grades of the unfinished fabric are used for such industrial purposes as bags, sacks, pipe coverings. Higher grades of finished osnaburg can be found in mattress ticking, slipcovers, workwear, and apparel.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

5/2 is a two-ply, mercerized, long staple cotton with 3,000 yds/lb. Pima is the finest cotton available. Pima's ability to resist pilling makes the garments more durable and longer lasting. Use Pima...
The potential shrinkage that remains in a fibre, yarn or fabric after treatment designed to reduce or eliminate shrinkage. NOTE: The expression is commonly used with reference to heat-shrinkage...
French for "false" can be anything made to simulate something that it's not. Examples: Faux graining (painting grain lines on figureless wood), faux suede (non-leather fabric made to simulate suede...
The ultimate form of artistic needlework, appliqué is the process of sewing something - usually a cutout fabric motif - to a garment or another fabric item for a decorative effect. Combine your...
Similar to resiliency. It is the ability of a fabric to bounce back after it has been twisted, wrinkled, or distorted in any way. Some fabrics are able to eliminate wrinkles because of their own...

Companies for Osnaburg:


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