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What is "Osnaburg" - Definition & Explanation

A coarse, strong, plain weave, medium to heavy weight fabric, usually of cotton. Used for industrial purposes, drapery and upholstery.
A tough medium to heavyweight coarsely woven plain weave fabric, usually made of a cotton or cotton/poly blend. Lower grades of the unfinished fabric are used for such industrial purposes as bags, sacks, pipe coverings. Higher grades of finished osnaburg can be found in mattress ticking, slipcovers, workwear, and apparel.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

These are warp faced cotton fabrics woven with 3,4, and 5 thread warp faced twills and 5 thread satin, with the twill lines running opposite to the direction of the twist of the warp yarn. Thus a...
A weave used principally for towels and glass-cloths in which a rough surface effect is created on a plain ground texture by weaving short floats, whereby warp floats are on one side of the fabric...
A jumper dress or simply jumper (British English: pinafore dress, pinafore, pinny), is a sleeveless, collarless dress intended to be worn over a blouse or sweater. There is sometimes confusion over...
Originally, textiles such as cotton were coated in oil to create resistance to moisture. Now, resins from plastics are used instead of oil. Olefin is a very versatile fiber with excellent...
Not completely waterproof. Pertaining to fabrics that because of inherent hydrophobic properties or water barriers made of films or membranes are able to shed light snow and rain. In an effort to...

Companies for Osnaburg:


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