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What is "Osnaburg" - Definition & Explanation

A coarse, strong, plain weave, medium to heavy weight fabric, usually of cotton. Used for industrial purposes, drapery and upholstery.
A tough medium to heavyweight coarsely woven plain weave fabric, usually made of a cotton or cotton/poly blend. Lower grades of the unfinished fabric are used for such industrial purposes as bags, sacks, pipe coverings. Higher grades of finished osnaburg can be found in mattress ticking, slipcovers, workwear, and apparel.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Another largely historic fabric that was popular in the 14th and 15th centuries. It was a very beautiful fabric which was often stripped with gold or silver. It had a satin base and was diapered like...
The distance between the beginning of one complete pattern in the fabric weave, print, or design and the beginning of the next identical pattern. Fabric may have vertical or horizontal repeats or...
Fiber sources are found in nature. That is, "any fiber that exists as such in the natural state." (TFPIA) Natural fibers used to create upholstery fabric include cotton, linen, hemp, silk and wool....
A finishing process in which a substance - like rubber, resin or synthetic compounds - covers the fabric on one or both sides. Polyurethane is a common coating for outerwear. Coating typically aids...
The make up of the yarn content of any given fabric ( 60% cotton and 40% rayon). By regulation of the Federal Trade Commission, this information must be provided in all price lists. Fiber...

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