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What is "Pilling" - Definition & Explanation

Balling up of fiber ends on the surface of fabric.
A tangled ball of fibers that appears on the surface of a fabric, as a result of wear, abrasion, or continued friction or rubbing on the surface of the fabric.
Small balls of fuzz form on a fabric surface as a result of abrasion, such as washing or wearing. Pilling doesn't affect performance until it starts to thin the fabric.
The tendency of fibres to work loose from a surface and form balled or matted particles that remain attached to the surface of the carpet.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Resistant to a specified agency either by reason of the physical structure or the chemical non-reactivity of the textile, or arising from a treatment designed to impart the desired...
A variation of a 1x1 rib stitch with 2 sets of needles There is alternate knitting and tucking on one course then tucking and knitting on the next course. The fabric has the same look on both sides...
A fabric produced by interlocking loops in a lengthwise direction. Warp knits tend to be flatter, smoother, more run resistant, and more stable than weft knits. Examples are tricot, raschel and...
Petroleum solvent almost as strong as turpentine. Faster evaporating than Mineral Spirits, but with similar properties and uses. Faster-evaporaing thinner for most solvent based finishes. Fuel for...
A design for menís drawers in which the pattern calls for additional fabric to be provided in the rear panels. This creates a "balloon" effect over the seat, providing for ease of movement with less...

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