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What is "Shed" - Definition & Explanation

In weaving, the shed is the gap between yarns on a loom when one or more, but not all, of the harnesses are raised.
An opening formed during weaving by raising some warp threads and lowering others to facilitate the passage of a weft yarn or a weft carrying device across the weaving machine.
The opening made across the WARP by the raising of some threads and the depressing of others. It is through this opening that the SHUTTLE passes and lays the cross of FILLING YARN of a fabric.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

5/2 is a two-ply, mercerized, long staple cotton with 3,000 yds/lb. Pima is the finest cotton available. Pima's ability to resist pilling makes the garments more durable and longer lasting. Use Pima...
Fabrics that contain fluorescent materials in order to make the wearer visible in dim and dark lights. These fabrics have the ability to reflect on-coming lights, which cause them to glow in the...
A cellulosic fiber produced by Courtaulds, spun from an amine oxide solvent that offers a higher degree of polymerization than is available with rayon. Characteristics: pleasant feel or hand, good...
From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and...
A natural fiber collected from the inner bark surrounding the stem of certain dicotyledonic plants. Most bast fibers are obtained from herbs cultivated in agriculture, including flax, Jute, hemp and...

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