TextileGlossary.com

What is "Sheraton" - Definition & Explanation

Sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. Sheraton style employs slender lightweight forms, using satinwood, mahogany or painted finishes. Without pedantic archaeology, it brought the Neo-Classical taste of architects like Robert Adam within reach of the middle class. In

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A necktie (usually just called a tie) is a piece of material worn around the neck. The modern necktie's original name was the four-in-hand tie. It is usually a dress requirement for businessmen and...
A mark left in a fabric after a crease has been removed, and that may be caused by mechanical damage to fibres at the fold, by variation in treatment owing to the constriction along the fold, or by...
This bast fibre comes from the Urena lobata plant. Wild, it grows 3 to 7 feet high and when cultivated can grow as tall as 13 feet. The fiber strands are cream coloured and have a wonderful luster....
Color changes in localized areas of a garment due to differential wear, such as the knees of blue jeans. Often evident in cross-dye shades of blends where durable press treatments are applied. Color...
Flame retardant fabrics have been treated with a flame proofing compound. These fabrics retain this fire retardancy for a limited time. Typically, flameproofing chemicals are water soluble and...

Companies for Sheraton:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Sheraton, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us anout yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2017 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap