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What is "Sheraton" - Definition & Explanation

Sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. Sheraton style employs slender lightweight forms, using satinwood, mahogany or painted finishes. Without pedantic archaeology, it brought the Neo-Classical taste of architects like Robert Adam within reach of the middle class. In

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Results from uneven wetting out on sanforize; usually caused by defective spray heads. Fabric will appear wavy or puckering when spread on cutting table. Difficult to detect while inspecting on...
A lightweight, plain weave, made of silk or manufactured fibers, with an open mesh-like appearance. Since the fabric is made with high twist filament yarns, it has a crisp hand. End uses include...
A fabric made from yarns with low luster, such as cotton or other staple length fibers. The fabric has a soft, smooth hand and a gentle, subtle luster. Sateen fabrics are often used for draperies and...
The raising of fibers on the face of the goods by means of teasels or rollers covered with card clothing (steel wires) that are about one inch in height. Action by either method raises the protruding...
A general-purpose solvent is for thinning high quality wood finishing lacquers. It is not suitable as an acrylic or automotive thinner. But is an excellent degreasing and cleaning solvent for shop...

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