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What is "Sheraton" - Definition & Explanation

Sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. Sheraton style employs slender lightweight forms, using satinwood, mahogany or painted finishes. Without pedantic archaeology, it brought the Neo-Classical taste of architects like Robert Adam within reach of the middle class. In

Some other terms

Some more terms:

satin-back crepe, crepe-satin, or satin-crepe) satin weave on the face and a crepe effect on the back obtained with twisted crepe yarns in the filling - 2 or 3 times as many ends as picks per inch....
A DuPont trademark for its spandex fiber. Any time you see this fiber listed on a label, expect comfort, movement, and shape retention that won't wash away. Lycra increases the life of a garment,...
These chemicals are salts or esters of phthalic acid. The esters are commonly used as plasticizers to soften polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and increase the flexibility, transparency, durability, and...
Two series of pairs of chips that show increasing contrast within pairs, and are used visually for comparing the differences in colour of textile specimens or the degrees of staining of transfer...
A jersey is a piece of wollen or cotton clothing with sleeves worn as a pullover; this is to say, it does not open at the front as does a cardigan. It is usually close-fitting and machined knitted in...

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