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What is "Sunn" - Definition & Explanation

A bast fiber obtained from the Crotalaria juncea plant. The fibers grow from 4 to 5 feet long and are retted and prepared like other bast fibers. Sunn contains over 80% cellulose and is highly resistant to moisture and meldew. This fiber is mainly produced in India although small amounts are grown in Uganda. It is mainly used for cordage, rug yarns, and paper. In India it is also used for fish nets and is sometimes used as a substitute for jute in bagging cloths.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

For film-forming wood finishes, the measure of reflectivity of light. This is normally measured as a percent of light reflected at a 60 degree incident. So it ranges from 0 to 100. Different...
Trouser-like Garment, Worn On The Lower Part Of The Body Alike By Men And Women. Literally, 'leg-clothing'. The Pyjama Was Worn In Many Cuts And Shapes, Much Variation Being Seen In Respect Of Girth,...
The crimped, rippled, wavy or pebbled appearance of a fabric where distortion of the structure has occurred as the result of non-uniform relaxation or shrinkage. NOTE: This defect may result from...
A trapezoid-shaped window treatment usually at the top of the window. Can be pleated or shirred and is often paired with jabots. A continuous or scarf swag is drape over a pole and on the left and...
Made from linen or cotton with a dobby or basket weave. It is strong. Rough in the surface finish but finer, shinier than cotton huckaback. Has variation in weaves but most have small squares on the...

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