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What is "Sunn" - Definition & Explanation

A bast fiber obtained from the Crotalaria juncea plant. The fibers grow from 4 to 5 feet long and are retted and prepared like other bast fibers. Sunn contains over 80% cellulose and is highly resistant to moisture and meldew. This fiber is mainly produced in India although small amounts are grown in Uganda. It is mainly used for cordage, rug yarns, and paper. In India it is also used for fish nets and is sometimes used as a substitute for jute in bagging cloths.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Similar to shantung, this textured fabric is recognized by irregular-sized, thick fibers woven into the base fabric. Fibers that create the texture, are thicker and heavier than those used in...
Basic plain weave that is crisp and smooth on both sides, usually with a sheen. Warp and filling approximately of the same count. May be plain, printed, striped, checked, plaid, or antique with...
Long rope with which the thick woolen coat worn by the Gaddis is secured around the waist. Draping means to hang or to adorn the body form with loose fabric, and to obtain a body fitted garment by...
One of the oldest textile fibers known. Though the fiber and the fabric are both commonly known as linen, it is actually flax, the fiber of the Linum plant. Linen is generally favored for its fine,...
1. Term means 'soft and light' - and was originally used for Japanese waste silk. Fabric is now made in many Far Eastern countries on power looms in plain or twill weave; is heavier than traditional...

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