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What is "Tack spitter" - Definition & Explanation

Colloquial term for upholsterer. Before pneumatic staplers, upholstery was commonly attached to frames with tacks. An upholsterer would put tacks in his/her mouth (which is why many were advertized as "sterilized"), roll them out on the tongue where they were picked up with the magnetic tip of an upholsterer's tack hammer. Common folklore says the upholsterers even ate lunch without removing the tacks and that if an upholsterer accidentally swallowed at tack, he immediately swallowed

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The Traditional Indian Dress For The Lower Part Of The Body, Consisting Of A Piece Of Unstitched Cloth Draped Over The Hips And Legs. Worn In Various Ways In Different Parts Of The Country, Alike By...
This term can refer to either 'seamless knitting' (See Seamless Knitting), or 'welding/bonding technology', which uses a bonding agent to attach two pieces of fabric together, and eliminates the need...
(also known as polyolefin and Olefin) - A manufactured fiber characterized by its light weight, high strength, and abrasion resistance. Polypropylene is also good at transporting moisture, creating a...
The potential shrinkage that remains in a fibre, yarn or fabric after treatment designed to reduce or eliminate shrinkage. NOTE: The expression is commonly used with reference to heat-shrinkage...
A heavy conventional twill-weave coating with a spongy napped surface that is rolled into little tufts or nubs to resemble chinchilla fur. Usually made from woold or wool cotton blends in coating...

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