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What is "Tack spitter" - Definition & Explanation

Colloquial term for upholsterer. Before pneumatic staplers, upholstery was commonly attached to frames with tacks. An upholsterer would put tacks in his/her mouth (which is why many were advertized as "sterilized"), roll them out on the tongue where they were picked up with the magnetic tip of an upholsterer's tack hammer. Common folklore says the upholsterers even ate lunch without removing the tacks and that if an upholsterer accidentally swallowed at tack, he immediately swallowed

Some other terms

Some more terms:

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In wet spinning, the polymer used to form the fibre is dissolved in solution. The solution is forced under pressure through an opening into a liquid bath in which the polymer is insoluble. As the...

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