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What is "Ties" - Definition & Explanation

A necktie , also simply called a tie, is a piece of material worn around the neck. The modern necktie's original name was the four-in-hand tie. It is usually a dress requirement for businessmen and probably the most common father's gift in the world.
Necktie: neckwear consisting of a long narrow piece of material worn (mostly by men) under a collar and tied in knot at the front; "he stood in front of the mirror tightening his necktie"; "he wore a vest and tie"

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A process in which a single filament yarn is twisted, set and untwisted. When yarns made from thermoplastic materials are heat-set in a twisted condition, the deformation of the filaments is...
A fabric of worsted, wool worsted and wool and cotton in a satin weave, some in small repeat twill weaves with a clear finish. Has a very good lustre finish which resembles satin. Some has a slight...
Tapestry is a form of textile art. It is woven by hand on a weaving-loom. The chain thread is the carrier in which the coloured striking thread is woven. In this way, a colourful pattern or image is...
General name for a horizontal wood part. In upholstery, used for support and for a tacking surface. Also crest rails on headboards and dining chairs, chair rails on walls, horizontal parts of a frame...
A selvedge that varies in width. NOTE: Variations in weft tension or lack of control of the warp ends within the selvedge may result in such unevenness. Pulled-in selvedges are caused by pulling in...

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