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What is "Tricotine" - Definition & Explanation

A fabric of worsted, wool, rayon, or blends with synthetics. It has a double twill rib on the face of the cloth with a very clear finish. It drapes well, and tailors easily and is medium in weight. It has exceptional wearing qualities and is very much like cavalry twill, but finer. It is in the same family as whipcords, coverts, and gabardines.
A woven fabric with a distinct steep double twill line. Used for trousers dresses, women's sportswear.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The raising of fibers on the face of the goods by means of teasels or rollers covered with card clothing (steel wires) that are about one inch in height. Action by either method raises the protruding...
Chemically, a substance that dissolves other substances, thus forming a solution. Water dissolves more substances than any other, and is known as the "universal solvent". In upholstery, solvent...
A robe is a loose-fitting outer garment of various types, including: * A gown worn as part of the academic dress of faculty or students, especially for ceremonial occasions, such as a convocations or...
A Windbreaker or windcheater is a thin outer coat designed to resist wind chill and light rain. It is usually of light construction, characteristically made of some type of glossy synthetic material...
A cap is a form of headgear. Caps are generally soft, and often have no brim, or just a peak (like on a baseball cap). For many centuries women wore a wide variety of head-coverings which were...

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