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What is "Tricotine" - Definition & Explanation

A fabric of worsted, wool, rayon, or blends with synthetics. It has a double twill rib on the face of the cloth with a very clear finish. It drapes well, and tailors easily and is medium in weight. It has exceptional wearing qualities and is very much like cavalry twill, but finer. It is in the same family as whipcords, coverts, and gabardines.
A woven fabric with a distinct steep double twill line. Used for trousers dresses, women's sportswear.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Originally A Silk Fabric Made In Damascus, Only One Colour, With Patterns Of Flowers, Branches And Animals In Satin Finish Contrasting With The Slightly Textured Taffeta Background. Multi-coloured...
Fabrics made directly from individual fibers that are matted together by forming an interlocking web of fibers either mechanically (tangling together) or chemically (gluing, bonding, or melting...
An open fabric of silk, rayon, cotton, synthetics, or nylon, that is created by connecting the intersections in a woven, knitted, or crocheted construction to form a mesh-like appearance that won't...
A long continuous, unbroken strand of fiber extruded from a spinneret in the form of a monofilament. Most manufactured fibers such as nylon, polyester, rayon, and acetate are made in continuous...
A warp-faced piece-dyed twill fabric that has a stout texture and a higher number of threads per centimetre in the warp than in the weft. NOTE: Some drills are made with five-end satin weave and it...

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