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What are "Asbestos" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 16-Jan-2023 (1 year, 1 month, 19 days ago)
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Asbestos
Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that was commonly used in the textile industry due to its unique properties, including high tensile strength, heat resistance, and durability. However, it is now recognized as a hazardous substance that poses a significant risk to human health.

Asbestos fibers are thin and can easily become airborne, which makes them easy to inhale or ingest. Once inside the body, they can cause a range of serious health problems, including lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis. These health risks have led to the banning of asbestos in many countries and the development of strict regulations governing its use.

In the textile industry, asbestos was used in a variety of products, including clothing, gloves, and protective gear. It was also used as insulation in industrial equipment and buildings.

Today, the use of asbestos in textiles is strictly prohibited in many countries. However, due to its long history of use, asbestos can still be found in older buildings, equipment, and products. Proper precautions must be taken when dealing with materials that may contain asbestos, and specialized professionals should be consulted to remove or handle asbestos-containing materials safely.

In the textile industry, there are now many alternatives to asbestos that offer similar properties without the health risks. For example, synthetic fibers such as fiberglass and aramid fibers are commonly used in heat-resistant textiles.

In summary, asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that was commonly used in the textile industry due to its unique properties, including high tensile strength, heat resistance, and durability. However, it is now recognized as a hazardous substance that poses significant health risks, including lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis. The use of asbestos in textiles is strictly prohibited in many countries, and proper precautions must be taken when handling materials that may contain asbestos. In the textile industry, there are many alternatives to asbestos that offer similar properties without the health risks, such as synthetic fibers like fiberglass and aramid fibers. It is important to prioritize safety when dealing with any materials that may contain asbestos to protect both workers and the public from its harmful effects.
Asbestos
A strong and incombustible fiber widely used in the past for fireproofing and insulation. The small, buoyant fibers are easily inhaled or swallowed, causing a number of serious diseases including: asbestosis, a chronic disease of the lungs that makes breathing more and more difficult; cancer; and mesothelioma, a cancer (specific to asbestos exposure) of the membranes that line the chest and abdomen.
Asbestos
A non-metallic mineral fiber which is not flammable. The fiber is woven into fabrics and used for theater curtains, ironing board covers, potholders, and other cloths where flameproof and heatproof protection is needed.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A term used in identifying the structure of a yarn, fabric, or other textile material. For example, details such as denier (decitex), filament count, twist level and direction, and number of plies...
Voile 549
Voile is a lightweight, sheer fabric that is commonly used in the textile industry. It is characterized by its fine and delicate appearance, which is achieved through a balanced plain weave...
(eyelet) - Formed by a contoured patch of zig-zag stitching, followed by a cut---a portion of which is circular. Eyelet buttonholes are usually used on heavy fabrics and/or with large buttons. A gimp...
Folded yarn, also known as cabled yarn, is a type of yarn that is created by twisting two or more plies of yarn together in the opposite direction from which they were spun. This process, called...
Tow 504
Tow is a term used to describe a type of textile fiber that is characterized by its long, continuous strands. Typically, tow fibers are produced from a variety of natural or synthetic materials and...

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