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What is "Bast Fiber" - Definition & Explanation

A natural fiber collected from the inner bark surrounding the stem of certain dicotyledonic plants. Most bast fibers are obtained from herbs cultivated in agriculture, including flax, Jute, hemp and ramie, but can include wild plants as well. Fibers typically have higher tensil strength than others kinds and are therefore used for textiles like ropes, yarn, paper, composite materials and burlap. While labor intensive, its production is considered more eco-friendly than the production of artificial fibers which are petroleum based.
Strong, soft, woody fibers, such as flax, jute, hemp, and ramie, which are obtained from the inner bark in the stems of certain plants.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The highest grade of material made from the best of stock: Saxony, Silesia, or Australia merino wool. Two up and one down twill weave is used. Cloth must be even and smooth for its use as covering...
Cut as an extension of the bodice, the dolman sleeve is designed without a socket for the shoulder, creating a deep, wide armhole that reaches from the waist to a narrowed wrist. Also called a...
A manufactured fiber, most often used in sweaters or pile fabrics, where little or no pressing is recommended, as the fiber has a low softening or melting point. However, it has also been...
A fabric composed of two or more preformed layers, at least one of which is a textile fabric, that adhere closely together by means of an added adhesive or by the adhesive properties of one or more...
Comes from the Anglo-Saxon 'owef'. It is another name for the warp or warp yarn. Sometimes in advertising textiles, the word has been used to imply filling yarn, and made to interchange with the...

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