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What is "Linen" - Definition & Explanation

Fiber from the flax plant
A fabric made from linen fibers obtained from inside the woody stem of the flax plant. Linen fibers are much stronger and more lustrous than cotton. Linen fabrics are very cool and absorbent, but wrinkle very easily, unless blended with manufactured fibers. Linen is one of the oldest tex A fabric that is used to cover the inside of a garment to provide a finished look. Generally, the litile fibers. Lining-ning is made of a smooth lustrous fabric. Loft- High loft is thick and fluffy, low loft is thin and dense. The higher the loft, the better the insulation characteristic.
A fabric made from linen fibers obtained from inside the woody stem of the flax plant. The term, linen, cannot be used except for natural fiber flax. The fiber length ranges from a few inches to one yard, with no fuzziness, does not soil quickly, and has a natural luster and stiffness. Linen fibers are much stronger and more lustrous than cotton. Linen fabrics are very cool and absorbent, but wrinkle very easily, unless blended with manufactured fibers. Linen is one of the oldest textile fibers.
(Non-crushable) A specially treated linen that is washable, durable and highly resistance to wrinkling. This finish provides greater resilience and elasticity.
Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. Linen produced in Ireland is called Irish linen. Linens are fabric household goods, such as pillowcases and towels.
A fabric made from linen fibers obtained from inside the woody stem of the flax plant. Linen fibers are much stronger and more lustrous than cotton. Linen fabrics are very cool and absorbent, but wrinkle very easily, unless blended with manufactured fibers.
One of the oldest textile fibers known. Though the fiber and the fabric are both commonly known as linen, it is actually flax, the fiber of the Linum plant. Linen is generally favored for its fine, strong, cool-wearing properties. It drapes away from the skin rather than clinging to it. In knitwear, linen is combined with other natural or synthetic fibers for improved strength and resiliency.
Thread or cloth made of flax or (rarely) of hemp; -- used in a general sense to include cambric, shirting, sheeting, towels, tablecloths, etc.
LINEN, elegant, beautiful, durable, the refined luxury fabric. Linen is the strongest of the vegetable fibers and has 2 to 3 times the strength of cotton. Linen table cloths and napkins have been handed down generation to generation. Not only is the linen fiber strong, it is smooth, making the finished fabric lint free. Fine china, silver and candles are enhanced by the luster of linen which only gets softer and finer the more it is washed. Linen is from flax, a bast fiber taken from the stalk of the plant. The luster is from the natural wax content. Creamy white to light tan, this fiber can be easily dyed and the color does not fade when washed. Linen does wrinkle easily but also presses easily. Linen, like cotton, can also be boiled without damaging the fiber. Highly absorbent and a good conductor of heat, this fabric is cool in garments. However, constant creasing in the same place in sharp folds will tend to break the linen threads. This wear can show up in collars, hems, and any area that is iron creased during the laundering. Linen has poor elasticity and does not spring back readily.
Flax is the plant, linen is the product from flax. The term. linen. cannot be used except for natural fiber flax.
Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant.
A fabric made from linen fibers obtained from inside the woody stem of the flax plant. Linen fibers are much stronger and more lustrous than cotton. Linen fabrics are very cool and absorbent, but wrinkle very easily, unless blended with manufactured fibers. Linen is one of the oldest textile fibers.
Linen is woven from fibers produced by the flax plant, and the term "linen" cannot be applied to any other kind of fiber except that of natural flax. Among the properties of linen are rapid moisture absorption, fiber length of a few inches to one yard, no fuzziness, soil-resistance, natural luster and stiffness. The fabric unless specially treated tends to crease considerably. Most appropriately used in cool sportswear.
  • A fabric woven with fibers from the flax plant
  • A high-quality paper made of linen fibers or with a linen finish
  • White goods or clothing made with linen cloth.
A fabric woven from fibers that offers medium strength and dyes well.
A durable, absorbent fabric made of flax.
Fibers of the flax plant, woven into fabrics that are cooler, stronger and more absorbent than cotton.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

This process is usually used on splits, or heavily buffed leather The finishing fim is created on a continuous release paper. An adhesive is applied to the film, and then it is pressed onto the...
Heavy metal free refers to dyes that do not require the use of heavy metals to achieve the fixation of colors. Toxic heavy metals, such as chrome, copper and zinc, which are all known carcinogens,...
Furniture design that stressed simplicity of form, which was first employed by English furniture maker Charles L. Eastlake in 1868. An Eastlake chair usually has rounded front legs on casters,...
The removal of dye from a fabric by rubbing. Crocking can be caused by insufficient dye penetration or fixation, the use of improper dyes or dyeing methods, or insufficient washing and treatment...
Neither a natural fiber nor a man-made one, it breathes like cotton but is much less sturdy. Versatile rayon is inexpensive and can be woven to feel like linen or wool. It is soft and drapeable but...

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