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What is "Mercerization" - Definition & Explanation

A treatment for cotton fabric or threads that involves a brief soaking in lye, under tension. This process increases luster, strength, absorbency, and dying capability, but reduces chemical resistance to acids and oxidizers.
A finishing process of treating a cotton yarn or fabric, in which the fabric or yarn is immersed in a caustic soda solution (sodium hydroxide) and later neutralized in acid. The process causes a permanent swelling of the fiber, resulting in an increased luster on the surface of the fabric, an increased affinity for dyes, and increased strength.
A process of treating a cotton yarn or fabric, in which the fabric or yarn is immersed in a caustic soda solution and later neutralized in acid. The process causes a permanent swelling of the fiber, resulting in an increased luster on the surface of the fabric, an increased affinity for dyes, and increased strength.
A treatment of cotton yarn or fabric to increase its luster. Its affinity for dyes is also enhanced. In the process, the material is immersed under tension in a sodium hydroxide (caustic soda) solution. This later is neutralized in acid. The process causes a permanent swelling of the fiber, thus increasing its luster.
a) The treatment of cellulosic textiles, in yarn or fabric form, with a concentrated solution of a caustic alkali whereby the fibres are swollen, their strength and dye affinity is increased and their handle (q.v.) is modified.

NOTE:

Stretching the swollen materials while wet with caustic alkali and then washing the alkali has the additional effect of enhancing the lustre (q.v.)

b) The process of steeping cellulose in a concentrated caustic soda solution.

This is a process in which the yarn is immersed in caustic soda solution and later neutralized in acid, which causes a permanents welling of the fiber resulting in an increased luster, affinity for dyes and strength.
Mercerization is a treatment for cotton fabric and thread mostly employed to give cotton a lustrous appearance. The series of processes was devised by John Mercer in the middle of 19th century.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A fabric whose weave is made up of 2 or 3 warp yarns or threads to every one weft. Weave with diagonal ribs and large number of variations. Diagonals may be set at sharp or blunt angles, may be...
Brought to Damscus by Marco Polo in 13th Century. A jacquard woven fabric with floral or geometric patterns created with different weave effects. Can be woven self-tone: one color warp: different...
The ability of a cloth to hold or pleat or a crease, which has been intentionally created, through the use of a heat treatment. Heat setting of thermoplastic fibers causes creases to be permanently...
A jumper dress or simply jumper (British English: pinafore dress, pinafore, pinny), is a sleeveless, collarless dress intended to be worn over a blouse or sweater. There is sometimes confusion over...
A traditional fabric utilizing a satin weave construction to achieve a lustrous fabric surface. Satin is a traditional fabric for evening and wedding garments. Typical examples of satin weave fabrics...

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