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What is "Moire/Watermarked" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 25-Feb-2023 (1 year, 3 months, 3 days ago)
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Moire/Watermarked
A corded fabric, usually made from silk or one of the manufactured fibers, which has a distinctive water-marked wavy pattern on the face of the fabric where bright-and-dim effects are observed.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The Ethereal Weave: Mousseline in the Tapestry of TextilesMousseline, also known as muslin in the English-speaking world, is a testament to the finesse and sophistication attainable in textile...
Solid 536
In the context of textiles, the term "solid" refers to a type of fabric that has a uniform color or pattern without any visible designs, textures, or variations. It is the simplest and most basic...
This lace often has a high profile, and is made using a needlepoint technique rather than embroidery. A heavier weight lace, the patterns vary from geometric to floral. Each pattern is attached to...
A fabric knitted on a circular knitting machine using interlocking loops and a double stitch on a double needle frame to form a fabric with double thickness. It is the same on both sides. Today, most...
cotton, linen, nylon. Plain weave, some made with a crosswise rib. A strong canvas or duck. The weights vary, but most often the count is around 148 x 60. Able to withstand the elements (rain, wind...

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