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What is "Pile Weave" - Definition & Explanation

A type of decorative weave in which a pile is formed by additional warp or filling yarns interlaced in such a way that loops are formed on the surface or face of the fabric. The loops may be left uncut, or they may be cut to expose yarn ends and produce cut pile fabric.
A term used to refer to the structure of knotted carpets and rugs forming a pile or nap. Wool, silk, or sometimes cotton is knotted around the warp in a variety of techniques.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A nonwoven structure made by extruding molten polymer through spinnerets to form fibres. Spunmelt processes are used in the manufacture of spunbond nonwovens, meltblown nonwovens and combinations of...
A woven construction in which patterns are built in at spaced intervals through the use of extra warp and/or extra fill yarns are placed in selected areas. These yarns are woven into the fabric by...
A lightweight fabric with a thick, heavy fleece-like surface. It may be a pile or napped fabric, or either woven or knit construction. End uses include coats, jackets, blankets, etc. Fleece fabrics...
A general classification of strong, firm, closely woven fabrics usually made with cotton. A heavier, open weave comprised of plied yarns (a number of single yarns, usually three, twisted together)....
A tightly woven fabric made by using only long staple, combed wool or wool-blend yarns. The fabric has a hard, smooth surface. Gabardine is an example of a worsted fabric. A common end use is men's...

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