TextileGlossary.com

What is "Post-Cure" - Definition & Explanation

A type of durable press finish in which the finish is applied to the fabric by the mill, but the garment manufacturer completes the cure of the finish by applying heat, using an oven, or press, or both to the completed garment.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Combining of two or more types of staple fibers in one yarn to achieve color mixtures such as heather, unusual dyeing variations, or better performance characteristics. Blends of natural and man-made...
Soft, white, closely woven cotton fabric calendered to achieve a high glaze. Used mainly for pocket linings, underwear, aprons, shirts, and handkerchiefs. Originally made in Cambrai, France of...
The physical parts of the zipper are: scoop teeth, chain, lock, pull tape, and slider. Zippers used in industrial clothing are metal or brass. Plastic zippers are used typical apparel garments....
An insoluble colorant is printed on the fabric as a paste or emulsion, heat cured and bound to the fabric with resins or binders. Allows for the printing of fabrics with fiber blends that would be...
A resistant to wrinkling created through the use of a variety of finishes and treatments. Wrinkle Recovery - Similar to resiliency. It is the ability of a fabric to bounce back after it has been...

Companies for Post-Cure:


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