TextileGlossary.com

What is "Post-Cure" - Definition & Explanation

A type of durable press finish in which the finish is applied to the fabric by the mill, but the garment manufacturer completes the cure of the finish by applying heat, using an oven, or press, or both to the completed garment.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A jacquard fabric usually made with a taffeta or faille ground. The design is created by colored warp threads brought up on the face of the fabric, leaving loose yarns on the back. These threads are...
A light, fine cloth made using carded or combed, linen or cotton yarns. The fabric has a crease-resistant, crisp finish. Linen lawn is synonymous with handkerchief linen. Cotton lawn is a similar...
Hue refers to the wavelength of the color and is completely separate from the intensity or saturation of the color. For example a red hue can look brown at a very low saturation level and pink at a...
A fabric made from yarns with low luster, such as cotton or other staple length fibers. The fabric has a soft, smooth hand and a gentle, subtle luster. Sateen fabrics are often used for draperies and...
The highest grade of material made from the best of stock Saxony, Silesia, or Australia merino wool. Two-up and one-down twill weave is used. Set in the reed at 144 inches and finished at about...

Companies for Post-Cure:


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