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What are "Sheaths" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 13-Feb-2023 (1 year, 14 days ago)
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Sheaths
Usually have straight or close fitting skirts, accompanied by a form fitting bodice. The skirt is often ankle length and sometimes has a slit in either the front, side, or back to make walking easier.

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