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What is "Crimp" - Definition & Explanation

Property of fibers exhibiting a wavy, undulating structure. Wool has a natural 3D crimp.
To squeeze a metal connector closed to form a fastener, such as hog rings or wire ties.
a) In Fibre

The waviness of a fibre, i.e. the condition in which the axis of a fibre under minimum external stress departs from a straight line and follows a simple or a complex or an irregular wavy path.

NOTE:

1. In its simplest form, crimp is uniplanar and regular, i.e. it resembles a sine wave, but it is frequently much more complicated and irregular. An example of three-dimensional crimp is helical.

2. Crimp may be expressed numerically as the number of waves (crimps) per unit length, or as the difference between the distance between two points on the fibre when it is relaxed and when it is straightened under suitable tension, expressed as a percentage of the relaxed distance.

b) In Yarn

The waviness or distortion of a yarn owing to interlacing in the fabric.

NOTE:

1. In woven fabric, the crimp is measured by the relation between the length of the fabric test specimen and the corresponding length of yarn when it is removed therefrom and straightened under suitable tension. The crimp may then be expressed numerically as a percentage or as a ratio, i.e. the ratio of yarn length to fabric length. In both methods, fabric length is the basis.

2. Although this definition could logically be applied to knitted fabrics or fabrics of pile construction, it is usual to employ special terms, e.g. stitch length, terry ratio.

The degree of corrugation or regular wave found in locks of fibre. This can vary from an extremely tight crimp with many closely spaced corrugations to a lock that is completely straight with no wave or crimp whatsoever. The presence of crimp may give more elasticity to the fibre once it is processed into yarn and result in better performance of the yarn.
The regular undulation along the length of an individual fiber or lock of fiber. A higher number of crimps per inch can indicate a finer fiber.
To bend, kink, curl, or wave a fiber to give it more loft.
In fiber, a nonlinear configuration, such as a sawtooth, zigzag or random curl relative to the fiber axis. Most synthetic fibers, both staple and filament, used in carpets are crimped. Fiber crimp increases bulk and cover and facilitates interlocking of staple fibers in spun yarns.
The natural waviness of the wool fiber; it varies with the diameter of the fiber.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The technique of permanently joining together two fabrics or layers of fabrics together by a bonding agent.into one package. The bonding of fibers in a single layer of material is called a web....
A small panel usually hung from the top of the window. It is usually folded into deep pleats at the top and cut at an angle at the bottom. It is often placed on each side of a swag as shown on the...
An imperfection, characterized by a ridge or mark running in the crosswise or lengthwise directions of the fabric. Barrˇs can be caused by tension variations in the knitting process, poor quality...
A short slip or garment designed to wear under dresses. Structured like a camisole, but longer in length. Current trends show women wearing chemises over jeans as outer garments. Chemises can also be...
A fabric that has been treated with a synthetic film-forming polymer (resin). This may be done to make the fabric firmer, heavier, more stable, to add wrinkle resistance, to reduce shrinkage or to...

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