What is "Differential Dyeing (Fibres)" - Definition & Explanation

Descriptive of fibres of the same generic class, but that have potentially different dyeing properties from those of the normal fibre.
(Dye-variant fibers) Fibers, natural, or man-made, so treated or modified in composition that their affinity for dyes becomes changed; ie, to be reserved, dye lighter, or dye darker than normal fibers, dependent upon the particular dyes and methods of application employed.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A jacquard fabric usually made with a taffeta or faille ground. The design is created by colored warp threads brought up on the face of the fabric, leaving loose yarns on the back. These threads are...
Cotton fabric made of combed yarn that comes in a plain weave with a crosswise or lengthwise spaced rib or crossbar effect. A thin sheer with corded spaced stripes that could be single, double or...
An old form of lithographic printing, for embroidery transfers. The design was transferred from the tissue paper on which it was printed, usually by ironing. Thick enamel-like pigments were employed...
Can be either a cotton or wool fabric, woven in a plain open weave, similar to cheesecloth, and dyed in the piece. Cotton bunting is often woven with plied yarns. Wool bunting is woven with worsted...
A changeable colour effect on a lustrous or shiny fabric in which the warp yarns and weft yarns are of contrasting colours. NOTE: The fabric normally has a plain weave or a 2/2 twill weave when...

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