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What is "Tensile Strength" - Definition & Explanation

(Breaking Strength) The strength shown by a fiber, yarn, or fabric to resist breaking under pressure. It is the actual number of pounds of resistance that a fabric will give before the material is broken on the testing machine.
(Breaking Stregth) - The strength shown by a fiber, yarn, or fabric to resist breaking under pressure. It is the actual number of pounds of resistance that a fabric will give before the material is broken on the testing machine.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Historically, it was made from an ordinary grade of wool that often had shoddy re-used or remanufactured wool mixed in. A twill weave where the weave is concealed. Mackinaw is heavily fulled or...
Any twill weave which runs from the left. The twill or diagonal line on the face of the fabric will run from the upper left-hand corner to the lower right-hand corner of the fabric. Leight Weight-...
A particular form of pressure mark (q.v.) in a fabric, and that is produced by the relief print-off of defects such as slubs or seams joining lengths of fabric, under excessive rolling tension or by...
The application of a size mixture to warp yarn. The purpose of this is to make the yarn smoother and stronger to withstand the strain of weaving, to provide an acceptable hand in the woven gray...
A narrow fabric made by crossing a number of sturdy yarns diagonally, so each strand passes alternatively over or under one or more of the other stands. Typically used in shoe laces and suspenders....

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