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What is "Anti-microbial" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 29-May-2023 (8 months, 27 days ago)
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Anti-microbial
Antimicrobial textiles refer to fabrics that are designed to inhibit or kill microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other harmful pathogens. These textiles are treated with chemicals that are capable of disrupting the growth and survival of microorganisms. Antimicrobial textiles are becoming increasingly popular in various industries, including healthcare, sports, and fashion, due to their ability to prevent the spread of disease and promote hygiene.

Antimicrobial agents can be added to textiles at different stages of production, including during fiber formation, yarn spinning, weaving or knitting, and finishing. Some common antimicrobial agents used in textile manufacturing include silver nanoparticles, copper, zinc, triclosan, and quaternary ammonium compounds. These agents work by releasing ions that can damage the cell membrane of microorganisms or inhibit their metabolic activity, leading to their death.

Antimicrobial textiles have a wide range of applications. In the healthcare industry, they are used in hospital gowns, beddings, and other medical textiles to reduce the risk of infections and promote hygiene. In the sports industry, antimicrobial textiles are used in sportswear and athletic gear to prevent the growth of bacteria and fungi that cause unpleasant odors. In the fashion industry, antimicrobial textiles are used in clothing, footwear, and accessories to improve hygiene and reduce the risk of diseases.

One of the main benefits of antimicrobial textiles is their ability to reduce the spread of infections. In healthcare settings, these textiles can reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections, which can be life-threatening for patients with weakened immune systems. In the sports industry, antimicrobial textiles can prevent the growth of bacteria that cause athlete's foot, ringworm, and other fungal infections. In the fashion industry, antimicrobial textiles can reduce the spread of diseases that are transmitted through clothing, such as staph infections, influenza, and tuberculosis.

Antimicrobial textiles also have other benefits. For example, they can reduce the need for frequent washing, which can save water, energy, and time. They can also prolong the lifespan of textiles by preventing the growth of mold and mildew, which can damage fabrics over time. In addition, antimicrobial textiles can reduce unpleasant odors, which is particularly important in sportswear and athletic gear.

There are several manufacturers of antimicrobial textiles, including Milliken & Company, PurThread Technologies, and Trevira GmbH. Milliken & Company offers a range of antimicrobial textiles, including its BioSmart? technology, which is a patented blend of quaternary ammonium compounds and a binder that can be added to cotton or polyester fabrics to make them antimicrobial. PurThread Technologies offers antimicrobial textiles made from recycled polyester fibers that are treated with a silver-based antimicrobial agent. Trevira GmbH offers a range of antimicrobial textiles for use in the healthcare industry, including Trevira Bioactive?.

In conclusion, antimicrobial textiles are fabrics that have been treated with chemicals that can inhibit or kill microorganisms. They have a wide range of applications in various industries, including healthcare, sports, and fashion, and offer several benefits, including reducing the spread of infections, reducing the need for frequent washing, prolonging the lifespan of textiles, and reducing unpleasant odors. There are several manufacturers of antimicrobial textiles, including Milliken & Company, PurThread Technologies, and Trevira GmbH.
Anti-microbial
A chemical that prevents the growth of mold, bacteria, mildew, etc. Also the related property of foam or fabric.

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