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What is "Areal weight" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 07-Jan-2023 (1 year, 1 month, 28 days ago)
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Areal weight
Areal weight is a term used in the textile industry to describe the weight of a fabric per unit area. It is typically expressed in grams per square meter (g/m?) or ounces per square yard (oz/yd?). The areal weight of a fabric is an important characteristic that can affect its strength, durability, and overall quality.

The areal weight of a fabric is determined by weighing a sample of the fabric and then calculating the weight per unit area. This measurement can vary depending on the type of fabric, the fiber content, and the weave or knit pattern used to create the fabric. For example, a dense, heavy fabric like canvas will have a higher areal weight than a lightweight, sheer fabric like chiffon.

Areal weight is an important consideration in the textile industry because it can affect the performance of a fabric in a variety of ways. For example, a heavier fabric with a higher areal weight may be more durable and resistant to wear and tear than a lighter fabric with a lower areal weight. However, a heavier fabric may also be less breathable and less comfortable to wear in hot or humid conditions.

The areal weight of a fabric can also affect its cost. Fabrics with a higher areal weight typically require more raw materials and more processing time to manufacture, which can increase the cost of the final product.

There are many different types of fabrics that are classified based on their areal weight. For example, lightweight fabrics like voile and organza typically have an areal weight of less than 50 g/m?, while heavier fabrics like denim and canvas can have an areal weight of 200 g/m? or more.

The areal weight of a fabric is an important consideration for many different types of textile products, from clothing and home decor to industrial textiles and technical textiles. As such, there are many different users and manufacturers of fabrics who rely on areal weight measurements to ensure that their products meet the necessary quality and performance standards.

One of the top users of areal weight measurements is the apparel industry. Clothing manufacturers need to know the areal weight of fabrics in order to determine the appropriate fabric for a particular garment. For example, a heavy, durable fabric may be appropriate for a winter coat, while a lightweight, breathable fabric may be better suited for a summer dress.

Another top user of areal weight measurements is the home decor industry. Home textile manufacturers need to know the areal weight of fabrics in order to create high-quality bedding, curtains, and other household items. For example, a heavy, durable fabric may be appropriate for a comforter or duvet cover, while a lightweight, breathable fabric may be better suited for a set of curtains.

There are also many different manufacturers who specialize in creating fabrics with specific areal weights for technical and industrial applications. For example, manufacturers of geotextiles need to create fabrics with specific areal weights in order to ensure that they meet the necessary performance standards for erosion control, drainage, and soil stabilization. Similarly, manufacturers of medical textiles need to create fabrics with specific areal weights in order to ensure that they are suitable for use in medical devices, surgical gowns, and other healthcare applications.

Some of the top manufacturers of fabrics with specific areal weights include companies like Dupont, which specializes in creating high-performance textiles for a variety of applications, including industrial textiles, automotive textiles, and technical textiles. Other top manufacturers of fabrics with specific areal weights include companies like Milliken & Company, which specializes in creating innovative textiles for a variety of applications, including home decor, automotive textiles, and protective apparel.

In conclusion, areal weight is an important measurement in the textile industry that is used to describe the weight of a fabric per unit area.
Areal weight
A term commonly used in the nonwovens and composites industries to denote the mass per unit area of a single ply of dry reinforcement fabric.

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