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What is "Cellulose" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 12-Feb-2023 (1 year, 4 months, 2 days ago)
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Cellulose
Cellulose is a complex carbohydrate that is found in the cell walls of plants. It is the most abundant organic material on Earth, and is used in a wide range of applications, including textiles. In fact, cellulose is the primary component in many natural fibers, such as cotton, linen, and hemp, and is also used to create a range of synthetic fibers, such as rayon and viscose.

The chemical structure of cellulose consists of long chains of glucose molecules that are linked together by hydrogen bonds. These chains are arranged in a linear, crystalline structure, which gives cellulose its strength and durability. In addition to its structural properties, cellulose is also hydrophilic, meaning that it has an affinity for water. This makes it an ideal material for use in textiles, as it can absorb and release moisture easily.

One of the key properties of cellulose in textiles is its ability to be spun into yarns and woven into fabrics. Cotton, for example, is made up almost entirely of cellulose fibers, which are harvested from the cotton plant and spun into yarns. These yarns can then be woven into a wide range of fabrics, from lightweight cotton voile to heavy-duty denim.

Cellulose is also used to create a range of synthetic fibers, such as rayon and viscose. These fibers are made by chemically treating cellulose to break down its molecular structure, and then spinning the resulting solution into fibers. Rayon, for example, is made by dissolving cellulose in a solution of chemicals and then extruding the resulting solution through tiny holes, which form the fibers. Viscose is made by treating cellulose with a solution of caustic soda and then extruding the resulting solution through a spinneret.

In addition to its use in textile fibers, cellulose is also used as a natural dye. When cellulose fibers are treated with certain dyes, such as indigo or madder root, they absorb the dye molecules and create a range of colors. This makes cellulose an ideal material for use in natural dyeing processes.

Cellulose is also biodegradable, which means that it can break down naturally over time. This makes it an eco-friendly choice for textiles, as it can be composted or recycled at the end of its useful life. In fact, many sustainable fashion brands use cellulose-based fibers, such as Tencel, which is made from wood pulp and is known for its softness and durability.

In conclusion, cellulose is a critical component in textiles, and is used to create a wide range of natural and synthetic fibers, as well as natural dyes. Its strength, durability, and hydrophilic properties make it an ideal material for use in textiles, and its biodegradability makes it an eco-friendly choice for sustainable fashion.
Cellulose
A white naturally occurring carbohydrate polymer found in organic woody substances of most vegetation. It is the basic raw material needed for production of rayon and acetate fibers. About 96 percent of cotton is cellulose. Man-made fibers based on petrochemical raw materials - such as nylon, polyester, acrylics, etc. are called non-cellulosics.
Cellulose
A white naturally occurring carbohydrate polymer found in organic woody substances of most vegetation. It is the basic raw material needed for production of rayon and acetate fibers. About 96% of cotton is cellulose. Man-made fibers based on petrochemical raw materials ? such as nylon, polyester, acrylics, etc. ? are called non-celluloses.

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