TextileGlossary.com

What is "Frise" - Definition & Explanation

Often made from rayon but can also be made from mohair, silk and synthetics. The ground or backing yarns are usually made of cotton. Sometimes jute or hemp is combined with the cotton. It has a pile (looped) weave with uncut loops. It can be patterned by shearing the loops at different lengths. Some made with both cut and uncut loops in the form of a pattern. Typically used in upholstery, Frise is also spelled Frieze but frieze really refers to a rough, fuzzy, rizzy, boardy woolen overcoating fabric which originated in Friesland Holland. Often used for overcoating material for soldiers. Irish frieze is quite popular and more reliable and is called "cotha more".
An American term used to describe a moquette with cut or uncut pile woven from mohair.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A substance that is added to a textile (uncoloured or coloured) to increase the apparent light reflectance in the visible region by the conversion of ultraviolet radiation into visible light and so...
Leather that is dyed right through during tanning and has no coating on the top of the hide. Only the top quality hides are used for this type of leather and they retain natural variations such as...
A crisp, sheer, lightweight plain-weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count, made of silk, rayon, nylon, or polyester. The fabric is used primarily in evening and wedding apparel for women. It...
Sisal or sisal hemp is an agave Agave sisalana that yields a stiff fiber used in making rope. (The term may refer either to the plant or the fiber, depending on context.) It is not really a variety...
A fabric in which certain yarns project from a foundation texture and form a pile on the surface. Pile yarns may be cut or uncut in the fabric. Corduroy and velveteen are examples of cut filling pile...

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