TextileGlossary.com

What is "Chatoyance" - Definition & Explanation

From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and positions. Certain finishes such as shellac or oil tend to bring out the chatoyance of the wood.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Fibers of relatively short length, inches or cm. Most natural fibers (except silk) are staple fibers. Staple fibers must be twisted or spun into yarns. Staple fibers expose more fiber ends on the...
A number, derived from the number of warp (or weft) threads per unit length and the linear density of the yarns, that indicates the extent to which the area of a woven fabric is covered by the warp...
Refers to fibers that are typically manufactuered through an electrospinning process, which spins fibers in diameters ranging from 10nm (nanometers) to several hundred nanometers, but usually less...
A very small twist of flax, wool, cotton, silk, or other fibrous substance, drawn out to considerable length; a compound cord consisting of two or more single yarns doubled, or joined together, and...
Has a longer or higher pile than velvet, but shorter than plush. It is pressed flat and has a high lustre made possible by a tremendous roller-press treatment given the material in finishing. Now...

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