TextileGlossary.com

What is "Chatoyance" - Definition & Explanation

From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and positions. Certain finishes such as shellac or oil tend to bring out the chatoyance of the wood.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

This is the most widely used finishing technique. The finish consists of an opaque base-coat of pigmented resins, followed by a protective top coat. The natural colour of the leather is completely...
a) In Fibre The waviness of a fibre, i.e. the condition in which the axis of a fibre under minimum external stress departs from a straight line and follows a simple or a complex or an irregular wavy...
Certain treatments to achieve a desired effect or performance, dry being those applied mechanically. Dry finishes are generally considered environmentally preferable and consumer friendly as they use...
Coir (from Malayalam kayaru - cord) is a coarse fibre extracted from husk, the fibrous outer shell of a coconut. Structure The individual fibre cells are narrow and hollow, with thick walls made of...
Results from uneven wetting out on sanforize; usually caused by defective spray heads. Fabric will appear wavy or puckering when spread on cutting table. Difficult to detect while inspecting on...

Companies for Chatoyance:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Chatoyance, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!