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What is "Coir Fiber" - Definition & Explanation

Fiber used for stuffing.
A coarse fiber extracted from the fibrous outer shell of a coconut. Brown coir is harvested from fully ripened coconuts. It is thick, strong and has high abrasion resistance; it is typically used in floor mats and doormats, brushes, mattresses, floor tiles and sacking. White coir fibers are harvested from the coconuts before they are ripe. These fibers are white or light brown in color and are smoother and finer, but also weaker. They are generally spun to make yarn that is used in mats or rope. See also "Natural vegetable fibers".

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A fabric with a single filling yarn woven over and under 2 smaller warp yarns. Commonly found in cotton shirtings but oxfords are produced in a wide variety of fibers and weights for many uses,...
One of the plain weave variations, which is formed by using: 1) heavy yarns in the warp or filling direction, or 2) a substantially higher number of yarns per inch in one direction than in the other,...
The property of fibers that measures strength. This is determined by the force required to rupture of break the fiber. Typically, this is measure is grams per denier, or g/d. Tensile strength measres...
Any One Of A Wide Variety Of Fabrics Used Between The Inner And Outer Layers Of A Garment To Improve Shape Retention, Strength, Warmth Or Bulk. Interlining May Be Of Woven, Knitted, Or Non-woven...
A method of compressing, shrinking and felting a fabric through the use of moisture heat and mechanical pressure. Usually done on wool and wool blends such as melton. The process often obscure the...

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