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What is "Conjugate Fibre" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 10-Jan-2023 (1 year, 4 months, 20 days ago)
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Conjugate Fibre
Conjugate fiber, also known as bicomponent fiber, is a type of synthetic fiber that is composed of two or more chemically distinct polymers extruded together to form a single filament or fiber. The combination of these different polymers creates a unique structure that exhibits properties that are not found in single-component fibers. Conjugate fibers are widely used in the textile industry for various applications, including apparel, home furnishings, and industrial fabrics.

The two or more polymers used to create conjugate fibers can have different chemical and physical properties. For example, one polymer may be hydrophobic, while the other is hydrophilic, resulting in a fiber with both water-repelling and water-absorbing properties. Another example is a conjugate fiber made of a low-melting-point polymer and a high-melting-point polymer, which can be used to create nonwoven fabrics with superior thermal bonding properties.

Conjugate fibers can be manufactured using different techniques, including melt spinning, solution spinning, and bi-component melt spinning. In melt spinning, the polymers are melted and extruded through a spinneret, creating a fiber with a core and a sheath. In solution spinning, the polymers are dissolved in a solvent and then spun into fibers. Bi-component melt spinning involves extruding two or more molten polymers through the same spinneret to create a single fiber.

One of the main advantages of conjugate fibers is their ability to provide multiple properties in a single fiber. This can result in cost savings and improved performance in textile applications. For example, a conjugate fiber made of a low-melting-point polymer and a high-melting-point polymer can be used to create a nonwoven fabric with excellent thermal bonding properties. The low-melting-point polymer melts during the thermal bonding process, creating a bond between the fibers, while the high-melting-point polymer provides strength and durability.

Conjugate fibers can also be engineered to have specific properties, such as antibacterial or antistatic properties. This is achieved by incorporating additives into the polymers during the extrusion process. For example, silver ions can be added to create an antibacterial conjugate fiber, while carbon fibers can be added to create an antistatic conjugate fiber.

Conjugate fibers are used in a wide range of textile applications. In the apparel industry, they are used to create fabrics with superior moisture management, breathability, and thermal insulation properties. Conjugate fibers are also used in the production of nonwoven fabrics for use in hygiene products, such as diapers, wipes, and feminine care products. In the industrial sector, conjugate fibers are used to create high-performance fabrics for use in filtration, geotextiles, and automotive applications.

Some of the top manufacturers of conjugate fibers include DuPont, Teijin, Toyobo, and Toray Industries. DuPont's Sorona brand is a well-known conjugate fiber that is used in a variety of textile applications, including apparel, carpeting, and automotive interiors. Teijin's Conex brand is a high-strength conjugate fiber that is used in a variety of industrial applications, such as geotextiles and protective clothing. Toyobo's VYLOPET brand is a conjugate fiber that is used in the production of nonwoven fabrics for use in hygiene products. Toray Industries' Torelina brand is a conjugate fiber that is used in the production of high-performance fabrics for use in automotive and industrial applications.

In conclusion, conjugate fibers are a versatile type of synthetic fiber that offer unique properties and benefits in textile applications. They are composed of two or more polymers extruded together to form a single filament or fiber, and can be engineered to have specific properties such as thermal bonding, moisture management, antibacterial or antistatic properties. Conjugate fibers are used in a wide range of textile applications and are produced by top manufacturers such as DuPont, Teijin, Toyobo, and Toray Industries.
Conjugate Fibre
A bicomponent or biconstituent fibre produced by extruding two different polymers through the same orifice.

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